How Athens Police Department keeps its Bobcats under control during fest season

Springtime in Athens has rolled around again. With it comes beautiful weather, graduation, and of course fest season.

Fest weekends tend to be much more disorderly than the average weekend in Athens. As a result, the city always sees a necessary increase in police presence. With such an increase in population and risky behavior, what steps do the authorities take to keep these young adults safe?

The number of officers patrolling increases dramatically during the spring fests. Officers play a variety of distinct roles during this time of year. There are authorities patrolling on foot, horses, and some in plain clothes as undercovers.

Athens Police Department’s Mounted Patrol are the most iconic role that police employ during fest season. They never fail to get attention from students.

Mounted police begin their journey at the Athens Fairgrounds and ride their way into town toward the fest attendees. They typically travel in packs of 3 to 12 officers.

“We use the horses because it gives our police force more of a presence. We think that the presence of the horses and the view we get from being up high helps us to defuse and control situations before they can get out of hand,” said Ohio University Police Officer Bryan Newvahner. Mounted patrol officers seem to get the attention and respect of fest-goers much more effectively than officers in patrol cars, riding bikes, or on foot.

The Athens Police Department does allow for students to pet the horses, they just request that the students ask for permission before touching the animals.

A group of officers that I spoke with were all in agreement that an officer on horseback is much more effective at stopping and preventing reckless behavior in addition to maintaining order opposed to officers on foot. Mounted officers in Athens have been used since 1996 and do not seem to be going away anytime soon. They have become a staple in the spring fest image and culture.

Police reinforcements come from around the state from locations including; Columbus, Medina, Dublin, and Summit to name a few. They come from all over Ohio to support the Athens Police Department during its busy fest season. The Athens Police Department shares a mutual aid agreement where each department assists the other during busy weekends. “We need reinforcements to accommodate for the huge jump in population and risky behavior,” said Newvahner.

“We typically make around 25 to 30 arrests on any given busy fest,” said Newvahner. “We want to let students have fun but prevent them from hurting themselves or anyone else around them.” The majority of the arrests that law enforcement make are for public urination, underage drinking, or public intoxication.

Some of the fest attendees were under the impression that the police specifically targeted their party while allowing others to continue. This left me wondering, why do officers shut down certain parties and not others?

The Athens Police Department clearly wants to prevent and stop the reckless and risky behavior that comes with fest season, but why do they choose to shut down one party and allow the others to continue? To an outsider, each party just appears to have loud music and many drunk college students.

The main criteria that officers take into consideration when shutting down house parties during fests is behavior. “More often than not when we shut down a certain address it is because they have had several repeated offenses over a period of time at the same location,” said Newvahner. The repeated offenses usually happen later in the day, after students have already been drinking for an extended period of time.

Police did not always shut down street fests as early as they do now. When Ohio University was on the quarter system only a few years ago, fests would go much later into the evening.

Police began shutting down parties much earlier on the semester system because the conflict between fest-goers and law enforcement was so high. Athens Police Department found that when they prevented the fests from going so late, the encounters they had with students decreased dramatically.

As is to be expected, some students are less than enthusiastic about their parties getting shut down by the police. One tenant of a Mill Street rental property, Stephanie Anthony said, “there were parties a lot louder and crazier than ours. I don’t know why they shut us down, it’s our property.”

Each student that I spoke with seemed to have a different opinion on the police presence during the fests. Some were appreciative of the presence that they had and thought that it made them feel safer in a hectic environment.

I spoke to Mark Taylor, a sophomore studying management information systems to get his take. “I feel safer knowing that there are police all around me when so many people are drinking. They pretty much let us do what we want and only get involved if it gets too crazy, plus I love petting all the horses.”

There are also students who find that the police are too intrusive on their festing. “The number of cops just seems unnecessary, we have gotten more and more every year for the last four years and they shut down the streets earlier and earlier every year too,” said Brett Webb, a senior studying geology.

Officer Newvahner said that there are a few steps students can take to stay safe and avoid conflict with law enforcement during fest weekends. “Drinking on the sidewalk is and always has been illegal, so do not do it,” said Newvahner and a few of his colleagues.

The officers also said that respect is very important when it comes to dealing with the police. They are there to maintain order and keep students safe, they are not out to get anyone or prevent students from having a good time.

He also said, “if it is your house, try to keep it under control.” Recurring violations, such as noise, public urination, littering, and intoxication can lead to a citation and the authorities asking students to leave if they do not live there.

After interviewing representatives from both sides, students and law enforcement, there seems to be a good balance of control and freedom for the students to have fun without harming themselves or others around them.

Students and law enforcement look to have another successful fest season in spring of 2018.

I love Court Street, you love Court Street, we all love Court Street.

In this video I recap my conversations with a few alumni of Ohio University to see what they think about Court Street after leaving Athens, Ohio to pursue their careers. I asked them what they think about Athens’ iconic brick road and how it has changed over the years from when they were students.

Emeriti Park is Athens’ finest gem

 

Rolling hills, valleys and scenic landscapes are staples all throughout the Appalachian plateau in beautiful Southeast Ohio.

Emeriti Park in Athens is no exception.

The four-acre plot situated along South Green Drive, merely minutes from uptown Athens, contains many of the features that make this region of America great.

At the center of the park is a pond with two beautiful water fountains which bring Emeriti to life. Sprinkled around and facing the pond are sturdy wooden benches, each dedicated to important people who made Athens and Ohio University what it is today. A gazebo overlooks the entire park across from a bridge which separates the road from the park. Of course, the pathways in Emeriti are paved with the iconic bricks which define Athens, Ohio.

Emeriti in January.

However, beyond just being a pretty sight, Emeriti Park is my favorite place in Athens because it is the one place on campus where I can go to truly relax.

Being able to get away from life’s stresses and achieving tranquility, no matter how brief, is something everyone should be able to do when necessary. Emeriti Park is the place for me to be able to unwind.

I vividly remember a time last semester where I was particularly stressed out over a few midterms. I took a walk and stumbled upon an empty Emeriti at twilight. It was easily one of the most beautiful and serene backdrops I had ever seen.

I sat there for almost two hours. I turned my phone off, put it in my pocket, lit a Marlboro and just sat and relaxed, isolating myself from the troubles and stress of life.

The next two hours, time seemed to stand still. It was almost a psychedelic experience.

I did not notice the many college students walking by the rows of oak and maple trees on the outskirts of the park. I did not care the wind was increasing in speed as the sun set, making it a bit chilly outside. I did not worry about the homework and studying that eventually awaited me when I got back home.

It was just me, my thoughts (or lack thereof, in this context) and the gorgeous scenery around me.  

It is almost hard to describe a situation in which one reaches pure tranquility and ease of mind. It just simply does not happen very often, if it all, in today’s hectic hustle-and-bustle lifestyle.

I fell in love with Emeriti Park that fall night.

After those two hours, I stood up and walked back home, conscious of the work that was still looming over me.
I didn’t care. I got to work.  

 

Check out Ohio University’s release about Emeriti’s 2014 renovation

Gamma Phi Beta: my second home in Athens

When thinking about my favorite place in Athens, my first thought was the best bars and special food places. As I thought about this longer, I realized the reason I love being uptown is because of the people I see when I’m there. This quickly changed my favorite place in Athens to the Gamma Phi Beta house. The best way to describe why is because it is a second home. Although I do not live in the sorority house, it is a place I can be myself with all of my friends.

Gamma Phi Beta big-little reveal, Photo by Allison Divens

Being able to have access to a house with multiple rooms is awesome. When I’m at the house I have the option to spend time in many of my friends’ rooms, be in the living room to relax or go hang out in the movie room. As I’ve learned the movie room is an excellent place to take a nap, which is a plus if I’m having a long day or there’s people in my dorm room.

My dorm room can be small and crowded at times. I have never been a homebound person, even when I lived in a spacious house with three other people. The past two years of living in a small room with three other people only makes me want to be out and about even more than before. In a way, the house is going somewhere else and an escape.  

Another fun room in the house is the kitchen. At most times during the day I know I can go downstairs to the kitchen and find many of my friends hanging out or doing homework. For me, it’s really nice to have others working on projects and being productive and caring about their academics. This motivates me to be better, and it’s fun at the same time. Also, I get some free meals each week at the house. This is always a perk, especially when I’m tired of dining hall foods but too broke to buy real food!

Another reason the Gamma Phi house is my favorite place on campus is because I know I will always be laughing there. I enjoy my time alone, but I’m very much a people person. While at the house, I have the opportunity to be a part of a family and hear all about my friends’ lives. Someone always has a funny story to tell about their professors or something hilarious about one of our friends.

I enjoy being at the house because there’s also a craft room where we can go to hang out and do projects or arts and crafts. I will be honest and admit that I may be one of the least crafty people ever, but I enjoy learning how to be better and try new things. At the house, we do many bonding activities. These can include anything from game night to watching The Bachelor or even decorating cookies.

Gamma Phi Beta philanthropy event, Photo by Abby Hagelberger

Finally, the Gamma Phi Beta house is my favorite place in Athens because I have the ability to grow as a person and bond with so many greats women that I can call some of my best friends. There’s a wide range of individuals who guide me and give me the advice I need to be the best version of myself.

At the end of the day, there’s always excitement and happiness in the house. It doesn’t matter if we’re hosting bid day or hanging out in pajamas eating Chipotle because I know that either way I will enjoy my time I spend there.

The recovery room

Early one morning in the spring semester of 2016 I confidently walked in to Room 321 on the third floor of Baker University Center. All a part of my “new year, new me plans,” I guess. Those plans lasted for as long as most resolutions do.

The door to Room 321 on the third floor of Baker University Center

You see, Room 321 in Baker Center houses the Ohio University Collegiate Recovery Community called RISE (Recovery to Inspire, Share and Empower). No, I’m not an addict. RISE does not only provide support to students, staff and faculty members who suffer from addictions and addictive behaviors, but also people who have been impacted by the addiction of others. This is where I come in. My father was an alcoholic for as long as I can remember until he died in August, 2012. As one would think, growing up in a home where the person who was supposed to care for you was almost always drunk came with its challenges. Needless to say, I have some issues.

Now let’s get back to the Spring of 2016. I had emailed Ann, the woman in charge of the program, to let her know I was coming in. Before, this my dad’s drinking and how it affected was not something I talked about, but I was determined to do something about it. So, I put on a brave face and told Ann my story. She was super nice and invited me to RISE meetings which happen every Friday at 3pm.

I attended three RISE meetings that entire semester. Don’t get me wrong, the meetings were good. However, it was not easy to open up and get comfortable talking about the things that were so personal to me. I made excuses (mostly to myself) that I was too busy to attend weekly meetings.

Flash forward to last semester: the fall semester of 2016. I was taking a Strategic Social Media class and needed a client to work with on my project for that class. I remembered that Ann had mentioned that RISE needed help with social media. So once again I contacted Ann, this time asking if I can work with RISE to develop a social media plan. She agreed but urged me to attend weekly meetings so that I can keep abreast with what was happening with the group. This was a blessing in disguise.

Students are encouraged to use this area to take a break anytime during the day

It’s funny how it was once so difficult to sit in this room for one hour each week and now it is one of my favorite places in Athens. I just needed to give it a chance. The room is always warm and inviting. Motivational and inspirational quotes cover the walls. There’s always pop in the fridge and coffee in the pot, and there’s a comfy couch that I can take a nap on anytime I need a break from the day.

What I love most about this room, though, are the people who fill it. It is so comforting to have a group of people who understand and support me. They always say at meetings that you can share as much or as little as you are comfortable with. Sometimes our conversations get really deep, but sometimes we just sit around and talk about our week, or whatever is happening in the world at that time. They have helped me to understand addiction so much more, and they also help me to keep my own actions in check since I know that it could be easy for me to also go down the path of addiction.

This week in Ohio sports: Bobcats are playing strong while conference games loom on the horizon

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Just as students are getting into the heart of the school year, many Bobcat teams are reaching the heart of their schedules; but, unlike some students, most of these Ohio teams are thriving as conference play begins.

Did the good guys win?

For the most part, yes. The football team pummeled Gardner-Webb University 37-21, while the volleyball and field hockey teams both picked up big wins over conference rivals. On the other hand, the soccer team lost a close one to Toledo while the women’s golf team finished in eighth place out of twelve teams in Michigan State’s Mary Fossum Invitational.

What does this mean for the football team?

The Bobcats picked up their first home win of the season in front of a crowd of over 22,000 fans, showing all the visiting parents that their child’s college team actually did have a chance against Tennessee last weekend. Redshirt senior Greg Windham threw for 143 yards and a touchdown while picking up 62 yards with his feet. Senior wide receiver Sebastian Smith finished with 108 yards and found the end zone twice off of six receptions. The Bobcats sit at an even 2-2 on the season as conference play begins next week.

What about the volleyball team, they’re good right?

Following their phenomenal 2015 season where they were crowned MAC Champions for the ninth time, the Bobcats have started this season with a lackluster 6-8 record. But don’t count these girls out just yet, they definitely know how to win conference games as they haven’t lost a set to a MAC opponent so far this season. The Bobcats swept the visiting Akron team in three straight sets (25-15, 25-23, 27-25) to pick up their second win over a MAC opponent. Redshirt junior Ali Lake led both teams with 17 kills; Lake has finished with double-digits kills seven times this season. This is the fourth year in a row the Bobcats have started 2-0 in conference play.

What happened with the field hockey team? 

70 minutes of play wasn’t enough for the Bobcats and the visiting Ball State Cardinals but graduate student Amelia Milton knocked in the game-winning goal in overtime to give the Bobcats a 3-2 win. Both Milton and freshman Gabby Lorenzo scored their first career goals for the Bobcats in the thrilling win. Although the score doesn’t reflect it, the Bobcats led in both shots, 14-6, and penalty corners, 11-3. Despite their struggles to capitalize off their shots, the Bobcats held on to pick up their first conference win and improve to 3-6 on the season.

Will the soccer team bounce back? 

After dropping their first conference game against Bowling Green, the Ohio women’s soccer team lost to Toledo 2-1 to fall to 2-6-1 on the season. The Bobcats couldn’t get their offense going against the physical Toledo team. Although Ohio had six shots on goal, compared to Toledo’s three, the Rockets had nine more shots and nine more corner kicks than the Bobcats, giving them more opportunities to find the back of the net. This is the fourth consecutive loss for a Bobcat team that hasn’t won a match since their 5-0 flattening of Cleveland State back on Sep. 2.

Mollie Whitacre (Maddie Schroeder | Ohio Athletics)
Senior Mollie Whitacre battles for possession  | (via Ohio Athletics)

How bad is eighth place really?

The Bobcats finished in eighth place out of twelve teams at the Mary Fossum Invitational over the weekend. Although many MAC teams were at the invitational, the Bobcats (+61) were outmatched in talent by more qualified teams like the Miami Hurricanes (-4) who demolished the completion. Despite the low finish, senior Hailey Hryenewich led the Bobcats and tied for 11th place in the tournament with a final score of seven strokes over par. To see how the rest of the Bobcats finished, check out the final standings here.

What’s going on next week?

Monday:

  • Men’s Golf host Bobcat Open in Worthington, OH

Thursday:

  • Women’s Volleyball takes on rival Miami in Oxford at 7 p.m.

Friday:

  • Men’s and Women’s Cross-Country teams compete in All-Ohio Championship in Cedarville, OH
  • Women’s Soccer face Western Michigan here in Athens at 4 p.m.
  • Women’s Field Hockey play Central Michigan at home at 5 p.m.
  • Women’s Volleyball hosts Bowling Green at 7 p.m.

Saturday:

  • Softball takes on Charleston University in a doubleheader in Athens, first game starts at 1 p.m. while the second starts at 3 p.m.
  • Football travels to Oxford to face rival Miami at 2:30 p.m.

Decoding the DARS: How I graduated a year early

The hardest part is over. You’ve applied, been accepted, and are ready to begin life as a Bobcat. Aside from all the excitement of giving your dorm room that personal touch, bonding with your roommate over  your newfound independence, and binge eating during that first trip to the dining hall, you suddenly realize that you’re here to obtain a degree. Enter the Degree Audit Reporting System, or DARS, and welcome to the Bible of your college career.

DARS Cheat Sheet. Use this to help decode what each symbol on the stars means.
DARS Cheat Sheet. Use this to help decode what each symbol on the stars means.

According to Ohio University, your DARS report is the official tool for tracking your academic progress, which analyzes degree requirements for a major, minor, or certificate according to the catalog year in which you entered the program. DARS reports are the printed results of the analysis. The DARS report displays the courses from which you must select in order to complete degree requirements, and it shows how the completed courses apply toward those requirements. In in simpler terms, the DARS is a report that tracks your progress to graduation based on the academic track you’ve chosen to embark on.

I’m going to explain the DARS step by step, because whether we like it or not, this little document full of random course titles and confusing phrases is the key to graduating. Uncover what those requirements mean, which options best fit you, and how to successfully turn each section from red to green.

  1. Locate the DARS 

 

2. University Requirements

 

3. Tiers

 

4. Course Requirements

 

5. In Progress Classes

 

6. Course Offerings

 

7. Free Electives 

 

8. Course Record

 

9. What-If DARS 

 

Go ahead and take a deep breath. You are now on your way to becoming a master of the DARS. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. Reach out to your advisor, set up a time to meet, and relish in the comfort of knowing how to stay on track to graduation.

 

Recap: Advice From Advisors 

  1. Read your DARS carefully. Take time to sit down and read through your entire DARS.
  2. Plus (+) and minus (-) symbols appear next to each section on your DARS and provide a guide as to what you have completed and what you still need to complete before you can earn your degree.
  3. Also, pay attention under each area where it says NEEDS.  This is telling you exactly what you still need to complete, whether it’s a specific course or set of courses, or a certain number of credit hours.
  4. It’s always important to email your academic advisor if you have questions.  You can find your academic advisor in two places: 1) In your MyOhio Student Center portal and 2) on the left side of the first page of your DARS, located just beneath your GPA.
  5. If you need an appointment with your academic advisor, always be prepared for your appointment.  Print and bring a copy of your DARS if you can, come with a list of your questions and concerns and bring a paper and pen to write down the information your advisor gives you.
  6. Use the course catalog to look up required classes for every major, minor and certificate.  This is also a great way to check requisites for classes, so you can be sure you’re eligible to enroll in the class yourself.

 

Other Resources

Ohio University offers advising help in the Allen Center on the fourth floor of Baker Center Monday–Thursday, 8 a.m.–7 p.m and Friday, 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Other majors also offer walk-in advising during a specific block of time once a week, no appointment necessary. Check with your advisor for details.

 

 

Clean or Dirty: The Fine Lines of Social Media in College

Since high school many students have always been told to keep a “clean” social media presence. In regards to “clean” students have assumed to not post anything that would come back to hurt them in the future. However, not all students have a similar belief in regard to social media.

Junior Brian Beckstedt feels social media is a form of free speech that should be used to express himself.

Ohio University Student tweet
Ohio University Student tweet

“It helps me to express myself better, and it let’s people know my feelings on a certain subject,” Beckstedt a business major said.

Beckstedt feels social media is for the benefit of getting the message out that he wants in the moment. Being a business major, he finds himself in a unique situation. Following college, he is going to join the family business.

Beckstedt recognizes not censoring his thoughts can be a potential threat to other employers but he wants people to appreciate him for who he is and what he believes.

“Social media can be threatening if you are using words too often it may shy a potential employer away,” Beckstedt added. “But for me I have a special circumstance where I work for my father, and other family.”

For Laura Garotti, a senior studying journalism she has a different tone in regard to social media. Garotti has to create a brand and an image around who she is for potential employers.

“I keep (social media) clean because as a journalist, I like to be transparent and be able to make all of my profiles public,” Garotti explained.

What employers think is important for Garotti. She feels future coworkers could additionally alter work life due to a social media experience.

“You also never know when a coworker will request to add you on Facebook and potentially show others what you post.”

Being a journalism major plays a big role in keeping her social media clean according to the senior. Having a major that is in the public eye is a major part of keeping social media clean.

Ohio University student tweet
Ohio University Student Tweet

“(Some other majors) aren’t in the public eye, but I also believe they don’t completely realize how little privacy you actually get when you go online,” Garotti added.

Most students have slipped up on social media from time to time and Garotti explained she is no different, but in regards to future job security she feels she is safe.

“Oh, I’ve definitely had bad posts that I’ve regretted, but nothing that I think would cost me a job, thanks to thinking before I post.”

7 Reason’s Why OU Athletics Will Not Be What You Are Expecting

Rufus fighingBrutus
Rufus fighting Brutus

Whether you’re signing on the dotted line of your Letter of Intent, or, as it is less glamorously referred to, if you are a “normal” student, not a student-athlete; submitting your nonrefundable deposit reserving your spot in the year’s freshmen class. It means the same thing either way. It means that you are committing to be a member of Ohio University and #BobcatNation for the next four….or five…or even six years as a student, and as an alumnus every year thereafter. Before doing so, there are a few things you should know. Most importantly, you should know that we are Bobcats, not Buckeyes. No matter how many times you say, “I go to Ohio University in Athens,” your family and friends will inevitably believe that what you are saying is that, “I go to Ohio State in Columbus.” This is a common misconception that sadly every Bobcat can relate to. Although both are public institutions just over 70 miles apart, a drive of less than two hours, the schools could not be more different in terms of culture, specifically sports culture. Case and point, Ohio University has strong athletic programs, but if you are looking for a Division I school where the entire student body spends the weekends at the athletic fields singing our fight song, “Stand Up And Cheer,” regrettably that is not something you will find at Ohio University. If a “sports school” is what you desire, Ohio University is not the school for you. Here’s 7 reasons why:

1  The marching band (The Marching 110) is more popular than the sports teams.

 

If you journey to Peden Stadium to watch Ohio football, you will probably see a fairly hardy crowd around 20,000 strong. Unfortunately though, that crowd that was once 20,000 strong will likely dwindle to a crowd of less than 10,000 after the Marching 110 has completed their halftime performance no matter how close the game may be. The reality is, sad as it may be; people come to see the famous Marching 110, not the football team, a tradition that has been in place for decades.

Free Shirt Friday Giveaway
Free Shirt Friday Giveaway

2  Free merchandise and free food giveaways can dictate student support of athletics.

Just as fans tend to only come out to sporting events to watch the band, fans, students in particular have a tendency to venture to Penden, the Convo and Bob Wren only with hopes of getting free gear or free food. After the giveaways, crowds usually shrink.

3  Students would rather buy beer than a hockey ticket.

2015-16 Ohio Men's Hockey Team
2015-16 Ohio Men’s Hockey Team

For all varsity sports student admission is free with a student ID. Club sports on the other hand require a $5 student fee because they are club sports and thus not university sponsored. Ohio hockey is a powerhouse program with four ACHA Men’s Division 1 National Championships over the last 20 seasons. When you have more than 25 home contests a season at $5 a person, it doesn’t matter how good the squad is, students are not willing to spend upwards of $125 to go to every hockey game when that same $125 can be used to cover weeks’ worth of bar tabs. Students would rather spend money on beer than sports tickets, plain and simple, it gives them more “bang for their buck.”

4  You need sports jerseys……but for parties, not sporting events on campus.


At Ohio University, the highlight of spring semester for most students is fest season. The coming of fest season means that for about a month, from mid-March- mid-April, there will be various street fests each weekend around town. At these fests you can expect two things. 1) Drunken debauchery and 2) A plethora of sports jerseys. The irony rests in the fact that all OU students act like huge sports fans when it is fest season, yet they won’t support the Bobcats at sporting events on campus.

5  Student-athletes are relatively unknown on campus.


At bigger Division 1 schools high profile student-athletes like a Johnny Manziel or a Cam Newton find themselves on Sports Center on a weekly basis and carry the status of a celebrity on their college campus. Other students routinely ask these future professional athletes for pictures and autographs alike. At Ohio, we don’t have that problem.  Our student-athletes are not fawned over by the rest of the student body. In fact some of Ohio’s best athletes go unnoticed as they walk up and down Court Street. Even 6’10, 260-pound forward Antonio Campbell, who was recently voted MAC Player-of-the Year, went unnoted by my two roommates as we passed him on the street walking to class earlier in the semester. How two self-proclaimed and knowledgeable sports fans did not recognize a 6’10 basketball star complete with a signature mustache as he passed them on the street, I do not know, but at Ohio, where sports aren’t a big deal…..it happens.

6  At Ohio, you are at the mercy of #MACtion.


Being an avid fan of the Mid-American Conference means two things. 1) Be prepared for the unpredictable. Where the best team in the MAC can either kill or be killed by the worst team in the MAC any given week in any sport. 2) Be prepared for inconvenient game times. As a member of the MAC teams are forced to play at times that are less than great for fans and athletes alike. MAC schedules are riddled with mid-week night games late in the season when the temperatures are blustery, balmy and bitter cold. Why? Because that is the only time ESPN will put a mid-major school like Ohio on national television. What can be done about this? Absolutely nothing. What is typically done though is that students do not attend the games. For some the weather scares them away, for others it is class and homework that prevents them from attending the event. Any way you look at it, #MACtion, as great as it can be hurts the Ohio athletics culture.

7  PLAYOFFS?!?!…….Mostly just a pipe dream for a MAC school.


Ohio athletics is fairly strong across the board it has seen success in all major sports fairly recently, it has seen professional athletes come through its programs as well. Despite all of the recent success’s the Bobcats have had on the athletic fields there is one thing that we must keep in mind. That is, we are a mid-major MAC school. This means that although we may have success, although we may make it to the post-season, we will never have certain athletic experiences like a “sports school” like Ohio State will have. An appearance in an historic game such as the College Football Playoff, the Men’s Basketball Final Four, the Men’s Hockey Frozen Four, among others just isn’t feasible for a smaller school like Ohio. For this reason, athletics aren’t as crazed here. Deep down, all Bobcats know, whether we want to admit it or not, we seldom if ever have the opportunity to play in the biggest game on the biggest stage.