Athens County Humane Society works to end cat overpopulation

Rural counties tend to have high populations of stray and feral cats, and Athens County is no exception. One organization that works to help homeless cats and kittens is the Athens County Humane Society, an all-volunteer group with no physical location.

The ACHS holds four spay/neuter clinics every month with the goal of cutting down on cat overpopulation by providing services to the community at a low cost.

Most of the cats that have been rescued by the ACHS are kept at Petsmart, but others, like Ted E. Bear, are taken in by the volunteers themselves.

Some Bobcats can still be found on Court Street at 2 a.m. on a Monday

On the weekends, Court Street can be so crowded that it’s often difficult to even walk down the sidewalk. But on some weeknights, the only people who can be found on this street are the few who have time to get drunk and those who have to take care of everyone who has time to get drunk.

Political events you probably didn’t notice this weekend in Athens

It may have been Parents Weekend at OU, but that didn’t keep Athens from getting as political as ever. Here are the top politically-driven events you may have missed while you were at the bars with Mom and Dad.

Tyre King Memorial

After 13-year-old Tyre King was shot and killed by a police officer in Columbus, a group of students and community members has set up a memorial on the courthouse steps. The memorial includes a variety of handmade signs to commemorate King, who was shot while holding a BB gun.

Continued debate over campus graffiti
In addition to the memorial, King-related graffiti has been popping up across campus, from the Civil War Monument to the graffiti wall. The graffiti wall was later anonymously painted to feature a hanged figure, although this was later painted around by students who wanted to express their disgust for the image.

Ohio mayors for Hillary

Chillicothe mayor Luke Feeney speaks with students. Photo by Ellen Bardash.
Chillicothe mayor Luke Feeney speaks with students. Photo by Ellen Bardash.

On Friday afternoon, the mayors of Chillicothe and Dayton joined Athens Mayor Steve Patterson and OU College Democrats in efforts to increase voter registration. The event, which was held in front of College Gate, was the last stop on an 18-city bus tour in which mayors from around the state met with Ohioans to discuss why they think they should vote for Hillary Clinton and not Donald Trump this November.

City Council Meeting

Photo via The Athens Messenger
Photo via The Athens Messenger

Today, Athens City Council will hold its second and final committee meeting of the month in the City Council Chambers. Council members are expected to discuss topics such as the ever-controversial pool. The Council will also hold a special session immediately after the committee meetings.

94th Ohio House District Debate

Looking forward, Ohio Student Senate will host a debate between candidates for Ohio’s 94th district House representative. The debate between Jay Edwards (R-Nelsonville) and Sarah Grace (D-Athens) is scheduled for this Tuesday at 7 p.m., although Edwards said he never actually agreed to this date.

Marching band made me love a nasty river

I know what you’re probably thinking: “Ellen, why is your favorite place in Athens a dirty river?” And if you are, in fact, thinking that, you do have a point. The Hocking River is not exactly what the kids call “clean” or “safe” or “guaranteed not to have used hypodermic needles at the bottom.” But it means a lot to me.

The Hocking is basically an outline of one side of campus. I can see this line whenever I make the trip from my hometown back to Athens and I can see it from the bike path where I run. But the reason I love it is because of marching band.

The Hocking in all its stagnant glory
The Hocking in all its stagnant glory

Ever since I came to OU two years ago, the 110 has been a huge part of my life. It’s given me opportunities that I never would have dreamed possible had I not decided to buy a trombone off of Craigslist the summer after I graduated, and it’s given me my best friends (it’s also given me irreversible joint and hearing damage, but you can’t win ’em all). And throughout all the time I’ve spent with this band, the Hocking has been there.

The 110 practices on Pruitt, which is right across from the river. The rest of the trombone players and I have music sectionals a few times a week under a group of trees next to the bike path. We also do this thing before we perform pregame at football games where the 28 of us all line up at the edge of the bike path and do a bunch of really stupid dance moves. The Hocking is visible during all of this, which adds up to about 11 hours every week.

Like many other rivers, the Hocking River contains water
Like many other rivers, the Hocking River contains water

Now, based on that alone, it might make more sense for the bike path to be my favorite place in Athens. But while it has its merits, it’s not. And I’ll tell you why.

The 110 has been around since 1967. In the past 49 years, very little has changed. We still wear the same uniforms and march the same way, and we also keep the same traditions.

Two of the most important traditions involve the Hocking. I’m not going to go into a ton of detail on these — they really won’t make any sense unless you’re actually in the band — but in summary, that disgusting river is really symbolic for us. We’ve marched through it and our band jackets, which we’ll wear at homecoming for the rest of our lives, smell like it. The Hocking is basically a border for everything the 110 does, even if no one really thinks about it that way. So, while there are countless other places in Athens that I love dearly and which smell significantly better, the Hocking River is, ultimately my favorite.

7 toddlers who don’t understand fracking

Toddlers are cute. They say cute things, do things in a cute way, and even wear cute things. But one thing that no one ever seems to mention is that toddlers are also very, very dumb. Some of them are so dumb that they don’t even understand basic environmental controversies. These seven toddlers know shockingly little about fracking, an issue which has ignited debate among millions of more informed Americans.

1. Sam

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Photo by Johnathan Nightingale via Flickr

Sam is clearly not very bright — he can’t even figure out how to wear shoes — so it’s not surprising that he knows virtually nothing about the scientific process of extracting fuel sources from the ground.

 2. Andrew

Photo by Bridget Coila via Flickr
Photo by Bridget Coila via Flickr

At first glance, it might seem as if Andrew is crying because he feels very negatively about previously earthquake-free areas of the U.S. being more prone to seismic activity after undergoing fracking, but he’s actually just sad that he can’t find his favorite toy. Andrew is more selfish than most big energy companies.

3. Maggie

Photo via Google Images
Photo via Google Images

Maggie is a mess, both because she is a toddler eating pasta and because she consumes energy with reckless abandon. Approximately 26,000 natural gas wells have been created in the U.S. in the two years she’s been alive, but she doesn’t know or care about a single one of them.

4. Joey

Photo via Google Images
Photo via Google Images

Joey is developmentally advanced enough to know how to drive at just 19 months, but he could not care less about where the fuel for his car comes from or if there is a more efficient way of obtaining it domestically.

5. Anna

Photo by dagon_ via Pixabay
Photo by dagon_ via Pixabay

Unlike the 15.3 million Americans who have lived within a mile of a fracking well since 2000, Anna can sleep soundly. She has no idea how fracking works, but that doesn’t keep her awake at night, even though it’s not like she has to get up early to go to work or anything.

6. Jason

Photo by PublicDomainPictures via Pixabay
Photo by PublicDomainPictures via Pixabay

Like many millennials, Jason has a world of technology at his fingertips. He could easily take advantage of this and do some quick research on the basics of hydraulic fracturing, but he never has. He can’t spell or type, but there’s really no excuse for this kind of ignorance.

7. Doug

Photo by Greyerbaby via Pixabay
Photo by Greyerbaby via Pixabay

Doug considers himself a nature lover, and you might think this would play a role in his opinions on fracking, but it doesn’t. In fact, Doug has no opinions on fracking whatsoever, because he doesn’t even know what it is. Get it together, Doug!