6 Mood Foods at Union Street Diner

Tucked away off of Court Street and a tad off the beaten path lies a major key to the Athens food scene—Union Street Diner. Located at 70 West Union Street, Union Street Diner is a 24/7, all-day breakfast diner.

Union Street Diner, or USD, is your typical, small-town greasy spoon. If you want some quaint and cozy diner, USD is not for you. The wobbly tables and funky wall art are what make the diner near and dear to the hearts of Athens locals and OU students alike.

So, when you’re bored sitting in your dorm with your friends at 2 a.m., suggest going to USD. This will bring about your first trip to one of many Athens gems. And when you sit down in those green booths, you’ll ask yourself, “What do I order?”

Here are some choices depending on how your first year at OU has been treating you.

Missing home: It’s okay to miss home and miss mom and/or dad’s cooking. But you’ve taken the first step of getting out of your room to have fun with your friends. And USD has another solution for you.

Order: Homemade noodles over mashed potatoes, choice of vegetables, and dinner roll

Price = **Thursday lunch and dinner special for $6.99

You might be poor, but you always have money for USD.
I’m sure you can find $4.99 tucked away in your futon.

Balling on a budget: There might be some days when you feel like you need to sell your kidneys in order to pay for textbooks. That may be the case, but be sure to save a few bucks for USD.

Order: Grilled cheese—any of five cheeses (American, Cheddar, Swiss, Provolone, or Pepper Jack) on your choice of bread and served with fries

Price = a whopping $4.99

You can't go wrong when ordering this meal. It's one of my favorites!
When you’re stressed out from the crazy college life, order a grilled chicken sandwich.

Stressed from playing college: You probably thought that high school was the most stressed out you’ve ever been with the ACT and SAT. College is stressful but so much more fun because you’re living on your own and learning how to adult. So just take some deep breaths and know that everyone is just as overwhelmed as you are.

Order: Grilled chicken sandwich on a corn-dusted Kaiser bun and served with lettuce, tomato, red onion, and fries.

Price = $6.99

Starving: There’s always the stereotype that every college student eats Ramen but I have never had a bowl in my 22 years of being on this earth. I do know that you can only eat Nelson and Shively dining hall food for so long.

Order: South of the Border burger—Fresh ground sirloin seasoned with Kosher salt and black pepper, grilled onions, tomatoes, bell & banana peppers, smothered by garden salsa, and melted Pepper Jack cheese and served with fries

Price = $9.59

Happy to be alive: Adjusting to life in college isn’t always a smooth transition. But if you’re loving your classes and making tons of friends, go ahead and satisfy your taste buds.

Order: Three chocolate chip pancakes

Price = $5.89

Indecisive: “What do you want to eat?” “I don’t care. What do you want to eat?”

Order: Chicken tenders served with two sides and a dinner roll

Price = $8.99

Other popular USD dishes include: mac and cheese bites ($5.99), deep fried pickles (5.49), chili cheese fries ($6.18), cheesecake (price not listed), western omelet ($7.59)

 

They're $3.99 and you can choose from vanilla, chocolate, strawberry, or cookies and cream.
I always have to give in and buy a USD milkshake.

PSA: Always order water because it’s the cheapest (free). If you’re feeling rich, go ahead and splurge on one of USD’s awesome homemade milkshakes!

If the pizza deliveryman knows you by name, I’d highly consider grabbing a group of friends and taking a walk to USD. The sooner you go, the better. You don’t want to have the next four years pass you by and be THAT person that says they’ve never been to USD. Seriously, don’t be that person. Oh, and don’t worry, they have free WiFi.

Flying with Scripps PRSSA

Eight rows of colorful, cushioned chairs were set up across the Friends of the Libraries room on the third floor of Alden Library. The week 5 meeting of Scripps PRSSA was set to begin at 6 p.m. on Monday, February 8, 2016.

Scripps PRSSA or Scripps Public Relations Student Society of America, is a student-run organization within the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism. The chapter’s main goal is “to offer members beneficial relationships with public relations practitioners that facilitate the learning, acquiring and development of professional skills -supplemented by educational knowledge- to be applied in everyday decisions”.

Jess and Megan have both created strong relationships and friendships through Scripps PRSSA.
Scripps PRSSA President Jess Carnprobst and Executive Vice President Megan Newton after Monday’s meeting.

A little after 6 p.m., Scripps PRSSA President, Jess Carnprobst, took the floor to kick off the night’s meeting. As a senior and member of Scripps PRSSA, I know the meeting’s typical routine. Every Monday night begins with announcements from the executive board regarding opportunities for dues-paying members, networking trips, and committees. After the exec board makes their announcements, members have the chance to make announcements of their own.

Then, it’s time for the “Member Spotlight” and on Monday, Grace Driscoll was the lucky member. The Member Spotlight is a chance for PRSSA members to share his or her accomplishments, passions, and goals with the rest of the organization. Once the Member Spotlight concludes, a professional speaker is introduced. Monday night’s speaker was Brie Strickland, a Social Business Specialist for Southwest Airlines.

Brie Strickland, a 2014 Southern Methodist University grad, stood up out of her chair and made her way to the front of the room. As Scripps students, most of us were used to hearing job titles involving the words “social media”. So, when Brie mentioned her title as a Social Business Specialist, many eyebrows were raised. Brie went onto explain that social business is “so much more than just tweeting”. Social business is a strategy form that looks at how social media impacts every aspect of a company.

“If you want to work in the social business industry, you need to get as much experience as possible. It’s such a new industry so any chance you get have a social media presence, take it,” advised Brie Strickland.

Scripps PRSSA provides great opportunities for networking.
Brie Strickland, Social Business Specialist, distributed her business cards at Monday’s Scripps PRSSA meeting.

Scripps PRSSA members were given an inside look at how Southwest Airlines operates their social media.

With nearly 4.8 million likes on Facebook, 1.9 million followers on Twitter, and 185,000 followers on Instagram, it seems like it would be impossible to keep up with all of the user activity. But Brie shared that Southwest Airlines has a Listening Center of 35 employees that work 24/7 answering questions, comments, complaints, and compliments via social media. Brie is involved with a lot of the goodwill engagement and pointed out that social listening is a major key to Southwest Airlines.

The laughter, chatter, and smiles that were shared throughout the meeting helped show how close-knit the Scripps PRSSA chapter truly is. After every Scripps PRSSA meeting, the organization gathers at The Pigskin to have dinner and socialize with that night’s speaker as well as with one another. This chapter will not only provide you with professional relationships but it will also open the door to many new friendships.

Scripps PRSSA is more than just networking trips and Monday night meetings. “PRSSA has taught me not to underestimate the power of people,” tells Scripps senior and Executive Vice President Megan Newton. “We might not be doctors or lawyers but we still have the opportunity to help people and tell their stories. Everyone in PRSSA has different personalities that we can showcase.”

Scripps PRSSA meets every Monday at 6 p.m. in Alden Library’s Friends of the Libraries room. Visit their website for more information on the chapter. And be sure to follow Scripps PRSSA on Twitter and Instagram, @scrippsprssa, for all things PR.

Six states of separation

“My dad was a contractor for the military so my family has moved around a lot, six times to be exact. Moving around a lot when I was younger was quite the challenge because people would always ask me why I was moving and I couldn’t really give them an answer because of security reasons. My dad couldn’t even tell me what he was working on. I still don’t really know what he does to be honest.  I’ve lived in six different states. I was born in California and then we moved to Georgia for a year when I was little. After Georgia, we moved back to California for another handful of years. Then we moved to Nevada, then to Texas until I was in the seventh grade. Next, we moved to Colorado and then I started high school in Cincinnati, Ohio. I enjoyed living in Texas the most but only because of the environment. Colorado was my favorite because I met so many great people there and they helped with the transition of moving. I definitely plan on moving after graduation because I hate Ohio. But, I want it to be a state that I haven’t gotten to experience yet.  Moving has taught me that it’s easier to welcome change than it is to avoid. The sooner you accept that things are changing, the happier you’ll be. Moving always gave me a chance to start over and it allowed me to work on who I wanted to become. I felt like I was able to get a fresh start every time I moved somewhere new and not many people get six chances at new beginnings.”
“My dad was a contractor for the military so my family has moved around a lot, six times to be exact. Moving around a lot when I was younger was quite the challenge because people would always ask me why I was moving and I couldn’t really give them an answer because of security reasons. My dad couldn’t even tell me what he was working on. I still don’t really know what he does to be honest.
I’ve lived in six different states. I was born in California and then we moved to Georgia for a year when I was little. After Georgia, we moved back to California for another handful of years. Next, we moved to Nevada and then to Texas until I was in the seventh grade. Then, we moved to Colorado and finally, I started high school in Cincinnati, Ohio. I enjoyed living in Texas the most but only because of the environment. Colorado was my favorite because I met so many great people there and they helped with the transition of moving. I definitely plan on moving after graduation because I hate Ohio. But, I want it to be a state that I haven’t gotten to experience yet.
Moving has taught me that it’s easier to welcome change than it is to avoid it. The sooner you accept that things are changing, the happier you’ll be. Moving always gave me a chance to start over and it allowed me to work on who I wanted to become. I felt like I was able to get a fresh start every time I moved somewhere new and not many people get six chances at new beginnings.”

 

Bentley Annex? What’s that?

JOB DESCRIPTION: Perform miscellaneous office duties including but not limited to: typing and computer work, copying, mail, collating, running errands and assisting with various departmental projects.

QUALIFICATIONS: Must possess typing and computer skills and have a desire to hang out with very cool history faculty and staff in a low-key, fun office.

My sophomore year I was fortunate enough to obtain a job as an office assistant in the History Department at Ohio University. At first glance, my office seems bland and desolate, but it’s the people that bring it to life. The intellect and compassion of this fourth-floor faculty has left a permanent mark on my life.

It’s rare to hear a person say their favorite place in Athens is their place of employment. But, Bentley Annex 461 is my home away from home.

My office in Bentley Annex
My job is much more exciting than my office…I promise.

When people think of the word history they immediately check out. My bosses along with the professors know how to combine work and play. If the office assistants ask to have a food day, we almost always get a yes just as long as we do the planning. They have taken us to Lui Lui and Sol and they have had Kiser’s BBQ and Avalanche cater for us as well.

I’ve learned many valuable lessons from the professors. The female professors act as motherly figures towards me and the other office assistants. They are often my counselors and confidants. I have gone to them for everything ranging from getting a big girl job to venting about mean college boys. The male professors often joke with me and discuss the latest issues in sports just as my dad does.

My office is connected to the mailroom and the kitchen so people are constantly walking past my desk. Every professor that steps through my door always greets me with a smile and a friendly “Hi! How are you doing?” It’s clear that all the professors have a genuine interest in how I as well as my coworkers are doing in life and in school (probably just so we’ll scan

One time I scanned 100 pages for a professor only to have it all deleted.
The majority of my work day consists of scanning entire books for the history professors.

their 8 million books for them). Most of the jobs/projects they have us work on, like scanning entire books, are incredibly tedious but they save the professors a lot of time. I have had to go through five pages of sign in sheets and check off student’s names for participation and extra credit points. Note to underclassmen: signing your name twice on two different pages does not count for two extra credit points. As office assistants, we get to frolic around campus posting flyers and we also help promote becoming a history major (even though I’m a journalism major) with cookies and hot chocolate.

At times there can be five different office assistants working at once which can be overwhelming for my bosses. If there isn’t any work to be done, we are free to work on homework and even watch Netflix.

A lot of my friends are envious of my simple yet super fun job and I don’t blame them. I am forever grateful that this position has allowed me to meet so many wonderful people. I have always wanted to pursue a career as a sports agent and I have had many doubts of whether or not I would make it in law school. But, the professors I am closest with have pushed me and helped me see that I am truly capable of anything. It isn’t hard to find faculty on this campus that want to see you succeed but to find a whole department is uncommon.

When the elevator doors open to the fourth floor in Bentley Annex, I always find myself letting out a sigh of relief. Bentley Annex 461 is my safe place and my favorite place in Athens, Ohio.