If you don’t find your space, make it.

My favorite place is in Athens wasn’t built by the university. It isn’t fiscally supported by the student activity fee, it isn’t on campus, and it isn’t even on Court Street. Probably about 99% of the student population doesn’t even know my favorite place exists.

It’s called the Hardcore House of Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

I know it sounds absurd, a hardcore house named after an 83-year-old Supreme Court Justice? It probably will more sound more absurd to you when you discover it is my own personal rental home off-campus. In addition to being the place I sleep, shower, do homework, and prepare my meals, it’s also a performance space for poets and artists from Athens, OH to Alabama to Brooklyn and more.

I probably should walk you through how I got here, seeing as you’re thinking about coming to Ohio University or have already enrolled, and I’m telling you that my favorite thing about OU isn’t even mildly campus affiliated.


When I arrived as a freshman, I was eager for something new. Laid at my feet was a fresh start, but I wanted to use my fresh start to experience the things I loved already in a new way. Music was a primary passion of mine, and I was already five+ years deep into a devoted relationship with DIY music, as I’d been playing and booking shows all through high school. I knew a little bit about Athens music scene through creeping the Athens, OH tag on Bandcamp, but I became fully immersed in it once I joined ACRN Media, OU’s student-run college rock radio station and media collective. The group of us headed out in droves to catch shows in living rooms, at bars, and in basements.

(Full disclosure, I became the General Manager aka head honcho of ACRN Media February of my freshman year, 3/4 because I am incredibly passionate about radio, 1/4 because I am an insane person who loves having no free time or sleeping.)  

Wolf Haus porch hangs after a show.
Wolf Haus porch hangs after a show.

DIY and ACRN provided a space away from the sporty party culture that bombarded me when I first moved in. I lived on West Green, a hub for student athletes, and I often found myself feeling a little isolated. A place to feel less isolated was surrounded by push moshing sweaty bodies in the basement of Castle Genesee. Standing on the sliver

Eating a family dinner of spaghetti at the Lodge.
Eating a family dinner of spaghetti at the Lodge.

of counter to watch bands in the kitchen of the Wolf Haus. Peering through the stair banisters to watch folks rip gigs at the Lodge. All of these house venues became transient homes.

The Lodge was especially important, as the people who lived there became our fast friends. While we went to lots of shows there, it became a destination on event-free week nights. My partner and I would trek over to the house with fresh groceries to make family dinners, and we’d all sit around and listen to music and laugh in good company. There was a family aspect, a community feeling that I really loved. I tucked that feeling in my pocket and saved it for later when the tenants all graduated and moved and the Lodge was no more.


It took me a long time to admit it, but the first two years of Athens DIY were a little frustrating for me, as many people around me were deeply focused on partying, and it got old quick. I got sick of watching people drunkenly disrespect each other’s personal space and safety, houses were getting trashed, things were getting stolen. It was a mess. I was drowning in an environment surrounded by peers who did not understand what it was like to work 25 hours a week while being a full-time student, who could bring six-packs of craft beer to a gig but not $5 to donate to the bands performing. I was getting burnt out on the one thing that made Ohio U feel like a place of adventure and promise, and I needed to do something about it.

(Reality Check: While everyone talks about the Bobcat Family and how they never want to leave OU, it is OKAY to feel unhappy here. There’s may be occasional moments where you just don’t know if you made the right decision or you are itching to graduate and move on to the next thing. This is normal, okay, and presents a chance to do something creative with your time here!)

It was at this time when I had reached my breaking point that we began planning for our move to the RBG. We had plans to have shows, but we started talking logistics, ideals, visions. The name came about because I’m obsessed with Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and I think she’s a bad ass. The hardcore edge came about because we liked hardcore music, but we also thought it would be funny to pair the two. Our logo represents the absurdity of such a name.

come and get em (at the LVL Up show tomorrow) also thank u @dan.manion

A photo posted by blair (@fruitbaby_) on

One thing that we all deeply cared about was having a strict “No drugs, no drinking, no exceptions” policy during gigs. We wanted the place to be as safe as possible for everyone, and any space that includes alcohol or drugs immediately becomes less safe. An unfortunate thing you’ll learn very quickly at OU that alcohol and drugs often reveal the nastier, scummier side of people, even within ‘alternative’ communities.

Grumpy jaded senior-citizen Meg comments aside, we really did want to create a space that was safe and intended to create community. I wanted to be somebody else’s Lodge. When we moved in and started facilitating performances, we were excited to see droves of kids coming to shows to hang out and make friends. I was starting to see students and community members I hadn’t known before, we were inviting poets to perform which brought in a fresh crowd of people to shows, and our home became synonymous with welcoming. We kicked off the year with a mixed CD/mix tape swap, and new Rock Lobsters crowded the floor and porch to share music. Bands started practicing at our house, we hosted shows for other people, we made friends, we gave people a place to go, and I think people have fun when they visit the RBG.

@divorcebandus was killer. So much energy packed into such a small space, fucking blown away.

A photo posted by Abigale Collins (@spacedemontia) on


Booking shows and facilitating community events without ever having to leave my home gave me a sense of purpose and a positive space to grow. My confidence in the OU/Athens community restored itself,  and I’ve had the pleasure of meeting so many wonderful people. It’s also something really cool and interesting to slap on a resume– “Events Coordinator at the Hardcore House of Ruth Bader Ginsburg” is sure to catch an employer’s eye! But let’s get real. I haven’t created this space and formed a sisterhood and music family just for resume-building purposes. The RBG was born because I needed it to exist in order to feel truly fulfilled in Athens.

Live recordings from some of our shows here.

 

Flyers from shows at the xxxRBGxxx:

[metaslider id=7314]


Here’s the moral of my long-winded journey and this e-scrapbook of memories. If you arrive at OU or are planning on coming here and can’t quite figure out what you want or what you like or what feels like home, try not to worry. There is nothing stopping you from being the creator of the space that meets your needs, accomplishes your goals, and brings you bliss. Athens and Ohio University are your canvas, so get ready to create. Your space may not exist yet, and that’s a-okay! If you can’t find your space, make it. 

A photo of The Hardcore House of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, which is nestled into an unsuspecting side road.

How I finished my major in two years

Although college is set to be four years, more and more students are graduating late, often because of a lack of guidance. When I looked at my major requirements, I noticed the high amount of general education requirements (or gen eds if you will) needed to graduate. Additionally, a good number of the electives that I wanted to take required me to take prerequisites (pre-recs) that I had no use for.

The DARS system can be tricky to figure out, and it might be risky to take certain classes, but it’s not impossible to graduate early. By working the system, I was not only able to be on track to graduate a year early, but I was also able to finish my major sequence by the end of my Sophomore year, taking classes I wanted to on the side as well. I’ve found a few tips and tricks you can use to take the classes you want, ignore the ones you don’t, and possibly graduate a year early. But before you learn how to beat the system, you have several important steps to take:

 

  1. Set up a spreadsheet of your class requirements.

 

I know this seems like overkill, but by putting all the classes I needed in a spreadsheet, I was able to figure out what classes I needed to take when, and even if a class I needed was full, I was able to quickly figure out what I could substitute.

Now, it doesn’t need to be color-coded or filled with various tabs, but breaking down classes by categories (i.e. Ged-Eds, Electives, Major Requirements) helps create a balanced schedule, learn the pre-recs of each class, and help re-build semesters if you decide to add or drop a minor or certificate.

 

  1. Get Green Slips

 

The fastest way to get into any class is to get a green slip. Green slips are pieces of paper that an instructor can sign so you can attend their class. Professors at OU are willing to sign you into their class, if you can make a good case. For example, I wanted to take a 4000-Level Journalism class that had a pre-requisite. Since I had experience in journalism, I decided to contact the professor to explain to her how I had a good case. Even though it was a 4000-level class, I was still able to a pass.

 

  1. Talk to Upperclassmen

 

Other people in your major have probably figured out ways to work through classes, and they won’t be shy to share. Talking to upperclassmen not only helped me figure out which classes and professors to take, but also that I could test out of certain classes.

 

  1. Check which classes you can test out of or substitute

 

Besides Advanced Placement credits, there are possible ways students can get out of classes. For example, Scripps students that are required to take Principles of Reasoning (PHIL 1200) can waive that requirement with a math credit. There are also tests to exempt you from classes, such as the Composition Exemption Exams, which can waive your Freshman and Junior Composition requirement.

Some of your requirements can also be substituted. This is especially true with minors. For my Journalism minor, I was exempt from all but one class, so I could specialize in whichever classes I wanted. This just requires confronting advisors and department heads about the requirements for the degrees.

 

  1. Look at online classes

 

Online classes are the easiest way to schedule in classes, especially gen-eds. Almost every gen-ed requirement can be taken online, including your Tier III. This is a great way to take a class that seems like a burden, but beware – taking an online class can cause you to forget about the assignments. Otherwise, it’s a great way to finish some work during syllabus week.

 

6 Mood Foods at Union Street Diner

Tucked away off of Court Street and a tad off the beaten path lies a major key to the Athens food scene—Union Street Diner. Located at 70 West Union Street, Union Street Diner is a 24/7, all-day breakfast diner.

Union Street Diner, or USD, is your typical, small-town greasy spoon. If you want some quaint and cozy diner, USD is not for you. The wobbly tables and funky wall art are what make the diner near and dear to the hearts of Athens locals and OU students alike.

So, when you’re bored sitting in your dorm with your friends at 2 a.m., suggest going to USD. This will bring about your first trip to one of many Athens gems. And when you sit down in those green booths, you’ll ask yourself, “What do I order?”

Here are some choices depending on how your first year at OU has been treating you.

Missing home: It’s okay to miss home and miss mom and/or dad’s cooking. But you’ve taken the first step of getting out of your room to have fun with your friends. And USD has another solution for you.

Order: Homemade noodles over mashed potatoes, choice of vegetables, and dinner roll

Price = **Thursday lunch and dinner special for $6.99

You might be poor, but you always have money for USD.
I’m sure you can find $4.99 tucked away in your futon.

Balling on a budget: There might be some days when you feel like you need to sell your kidneys in order to pay for textbooks. That may be the case, but be sure to save a few bucks for USD.

Order: Grilled cheese—any of five cheeses (American, Cheddar, Swiss, Provolone, or Pepper Jack) on your choice of bread and served with fries

Price = a whopping $4.99

You can't go wrong when ordering this meal. It's one of my favorites!
When you’re stressed out from the crazy college life, order a grilled chicken sandwich.

Stressed from playing college: You probably thought that high school was the most stressed out you’ve ever been with the ACT and SAT. College is stressful but so much more fun because you’re living on your own and learning how to adult. So just take some deep breaths and know that everyone is just as overwhelmed as you are.

Order: Grilled chicken sandwich on a corn-dusted Kaiser bun and served with lettuce, tomato, red onion, and fries.

Price = $6.99

Starving: There’s always the stereotype that every college student eats Ramen but I have never had a bowl in my 22 years of being on this earth. I do know that you can only eat Nelson and Shively dining hall food for so long.

Order: South of the Border burger—Fresh ground sirloin seasoned with Kosher salt and black pepper, grilled onions, tomatoes, bell & banana peppers, smothered by garden salsa, and melted Pepper Jack cheese and served with fries

Price = $9.59

Happy to be alive: Adjusting to life in college isn’t always a smooth transition. But if you’re loving your classes and making tons of friends, go ahead and satisfy your taste buds.

Order: Three chocolate chip pancakes

Price = $5.89

Indecisive: “What do you want to eat?” “I don’t care. What do you want to eat?”

Order: Chicken tenders served with two sides and a dinner roll

Price = $8.99

Other popular USD dishes include: mac and cheese bites ($5.99), deep fried pickles (5.49), chili cheese fries ($6.18), cheesecake (price not listed), western omelet ($7.59)

 

They're $3.99 and you can choose from vanilla, chocolate, strawberry, or cookies and cream.
I always have to give in and buy a USD milkshake.

PSA: Always order water because it’s the cheapest (free). If you’re feeling rich, go ahead and splurge on one of USD’s awesome homemade milkshakes!

If the pizza deliveryman knows you by name, I’d highly consider grabbing a group of friends and taking a walk to USD. The sooner you go, the better. You don’t want to have the next four years pass you by and be THAT person that says they’ve never been to USD. Seriously, don’t be that person. Oh, and don’t worry, they have free WiFi.

Under 21 in Athens? Go Hiking.

Sometimes, you need to go on a true adventure to understand where you are in the universe. I’m not talking about a night of binge drinking with the bros/bras. I am referring to a journey of spirit and vigor. A hiking trip. Holla back. Below, I outline some of the many ways to have fun in Athens while under 21 years old. Drinking is overrated, dudes. #Straightedgeforlife #Killingit #Godsnotdead

7 Reason’s Why OU Athletics Will Not Be What You Are Expecting

Rufus fighingBrutus
Rufus fighting Brutus

Whether you’re signing on the dotted line of your Letter of Intent, or, as it is less glamorously referred to, if you are a “normal” student, not a student-athlete; submitting your nonrefundable deposit reserving your spot in the year’s freshmen class. It means the same thing either way. It means that you are committing to be a member of Ohio University and #BobcatNation for the next four….or five…or even six years as a student, and as an alumnus every year thereafter. Before doing so, there are a few things you should know. Most importantly, you should know that we are Bobcats, not Buckeyes. No matter how many times you say, “I go to Ohio University in Athens,” your family and friends will inevitably believe that what you are saying is that, “I go to Ohio State in Columbus.” This is a common misconception that sadly every Bobcat can relate to. Although both are public institutions just over 70 miles apart, a drive of less than two hours, the schools could not be more different in terms of culture, specifically sports culture. Case and point, Ohio University has strong athletic programs, but if you are looking for a Division I school where the entire student body spends the weekends at the athletic fields singing our fight song, “Stand Up And Cheer,” regrettably that is not something you will find at Ohio University. If a “sports school” is what you desire, Ohio University is not the school for you. Here’s 7 reasons why:

1  The marching band (The Marching 110) is more popular than the sports teams.

 

If you journey to Peden Stadium to watch Ohio football, you will probably see a fairly hardy crowd around 20,000 strong. Unfortunately though, that crowd that was once 20,000 strong will likely dwindle to a crowd of less than 10,000 after the Marching 110 has completed their halftime performance no matter how close the game may be. The reality is, sad as it may be; people come to see the famous Marching 110, not the football team, a tradition that has been in place for decades.

Free Shirt Friday Giveaway
Free Shirt Friday Giveaway

2  Free merchandise and free food giveaways can dictate student support of athletics.

Just as fans tend to only come out to sporting events to watch the band, fans, students in particular have a tendency to venture to Penden, the Convo and Bob Wren only with hopes of getting free gear or free food. After the giveaways, crowds usually shrink.

3  Students would rather buy beer than a hockey ticket.

2015-16 Ohio Men's Hockey Team
2015-16 Ohio Men’s Hockey Team

For all varsity sports student admission is free with a student ID. Club sports on the other hand require a $5 student fee because they are club sports and thus not university sponsored. Ohio hockey is a powerhouse program with four ACHA Men’s Division 1 National Championships over the last 20 seasons. When you have more than 25 home contests a season at $5 a person, it doesn’t matter how good the squad is, students are not willing to spend upwards of $125 to go to every hockey game when that same $125 can be used to cover weeks’ worth of bar tabs. Students would rather spend money on beer than sports tickets, plain and simple, it gives them more “bang for their buck.”

4  You need sports jerseys……but for parties, not sporting events on campus.


At Ohio University, the highlight of spring semester for most students is fest season. The coming of fest season means that for about a month, from mid-March- mid-April, there will be various street fests each weekend around town. At these fests you can expect two things. 1) Drunken debauchery and 2) A plethora of sports jerseys. The irony rests in the fact that all OU students act like huge sports fans when it is fest season, yet they won’t support the Bobcats at sporting events on campus.

5  Student-athletes are relatively unknown on campus.


At bigger Division 1 schools high profile student-athletes like a Johnny Manziel or a Cam Newton find themselves on Sports Center on a weekly basis and carry the status of a celebrity on their college campus. Other students routinely ask these future professional athletes for pictures and autographs alike. At Ohio, we don’t have that problem.  Our student-athletes are not fawned over by the rest of the student body. In fact some of Ohio’s best athletes go unnoticed as they walk up and down Court Street. Even 6’10, 260-pound forward Antonio Campbell, who was recently voted MAC Player-of-the Year, went unnoted by my two roommates as we passed him on the street walking to class earlier in the semester. How two self-proclaimed and knowledgeable sports fans did not recognize a 6’10 basketball star complete with a signature mustache as he passed them on the street, I do not know, but at Ohio, where sports aren’t a big deal…..it happens.

6  At Ohio, you are at the mercy of #MACtion.


Being an avid fan of the Mid-American Conference means two things. 1) Be prepared for the unpredictable. Where the best team in the MAC can either kill or be killed by the worst team in the MAC any given week in any sport. 2) Be prepared for inconvenient game times. As a member of the MAC teams are forced to play at times that are less than great for fans and athletes alike. MAC schedules are riddled with mid-week night games late in the season when the temperatures are blustery, balmy and bitter cold. Why? Because that is the only time ESPN will put a mid-major school like Ohio on national television. What can be done about this? Absolutely nothing. What is typically done though is that students do not attend the games. For some the weather scares them away, for others it is class and homework that prevents them from attending the event. Any way you look at it, #MACtion, as great as it can be hurts the Ohio athletics culture.

7  PLAYOFFS?!?!…….Mostly just a pipe dream for a MAC school.


Ohio athletics is fairly strong across the board it has seen success in all major sports fairly recently, it has seen professional athletes come through its programs as well. Despite all of the recent success’s the Bobcats have had on the athletic fields there is one thing that we must keep in mind. That is, we are a mid-major MAC school. This means that although we may have success, although we may make it to the post-season, we will never have certain athletic experiences like a “sports school” like Ohio State will have. An appearance in an historic game such as the College Football Playoff, the Men’s Basketball Final Four, the Men’s Hockey Frozen Four, among others just isn’t feasible for a smaller school like Ohio. For this reason, athletics aren’t as crazed here. Deep down, all Bobcats know, whether we want to admit it or not, we seldom if ever have the opportunity to play in the biggest game on the biggest stage.

 

 

 

 

 

What to Do When…Dorm Edition

Living in the dorms is considered a rite of passage for college. It’s fun and something you’ll remember forever, but sometimes you have problems. Whether it’s a bad roommate, or you have Athens’ squirrels in your walls, follow these tips to solve any problems you may have in your dorms:

  1. You have water damage/mold/squirrels in your room: Yes, this may sound horrible, but it does happen. For example, I had squirrels living in my walls for months until someone came and trapped them. Through the fall, winter, and yes, even mating season. When this happens, make sure you fill out a work order. Maintenance usually comes within 5 days or so, so get on and get your room fixed. You also don’t want any charges at the end of the year.

  2. You have loud neighbors: Confront them. If your neighbors are so loud that you can’t even sleep at night, that’s a big problem. Don’t be scared to knock and tell them to keep it down. You are all sharing a space together, and everyone needs to be courteous of each other. If they still don’t quiet down after that, tell your RA. It should be fixed after that. No one should be sleep deprived because someone has to play Drake at 100% volume every night. giphy-1
  3. You have roommate issues: Talk to your roommate first. If they don’t respect your sleeping schedule, throw trash all over the room or always have their significant other over, TALK TO THEM. No one can solve this problem but yourself. But, if you talk to them and nothing changes, go to your RA. Most likely, you and your roommate had to sign a roommate contract, and she’ll get in trouble.
    http://badroommateproblems.tumblr.com/post/22158690135/so-did-you-know-milk-grows-stuff

  4. Your room is too hot/too cold: If your room is too hot, shove towels underneath the floor vent heaters. It’ll prevent air from coming in them and make your room colder. Also, even if you have an AC unit, invest in a fan. It drowns out neighbor noise and makes your room cooler. If your room is too cold, tell your RA or Resident Director. They can put in a work order to fix it. If that doesn’t fix your room, usually maintenance will bring you a space heater to stay warm. giphy-1
  5. You have no space/storage: If you have too much stuff, living in a dorm is going to be hard for you. Before you come to school, make sure you downsize. Don’t bring all 12 pairs of your high heels (you won’t wear them), and shop for basic clothing rather than items that only go with one pair of pants. Your closet, laundry and space in your room will thank you. Also invest in plastic drawers. You can put them anywhere and they hold anything. Plus, when you move out, you can duct tape them shut and move with them.

The “Dos and Don’ts” of Dorm Bathrooms

Living in the dorms is an adventure that every college student should experience. You will have your good dorm days, and your bad, but those days are the ones you’ll remember most. But, before you move in, make sure you follow these bathroom dos and don’ts.

The Court Street Stories Dorm Bathroom Dos and Don’ts 

  1. DO wear flip-flops when going to the bathroom. The floors in bathrooms are only (poorly) cleaned once a week, so it’s a breeding ground for fungus. Unless you want nasty yellow feet, I suggest throwing on a pair of sandals. You don’t want hair stuck on the bottom of your feet, either.      

  2. DON’T make hair art on the walls of the showers. You know, those rorschach test-looking things? The clumps of hair that look like small rodents? Yeah, don’t put those on the walls. We don’t want your dead, old, long hair right above the shower handle. You may have gotten away with this at home, but you won’t here.

  3. DO get a shower caddy big enough for all your products. No one likes fumbling around with shampoo, conditioner, soap, shaving cream, body wash, etc. Get a shower caddy with drain holes and forget about the fumbling around. Also, who wants to set their stuff down directly on the shower floor? Gross.

  4. DON’T pour food down the sinks. Most likely, you’ll share a dorm bathroom with almost 20 people, and may only have 3-4 sinks. When someone decides to pour ramen down one of the sinks, POOF! It’s clogged and you can’t use it until maintenance decides to come fix it. That means at 9 a.m. wake up time, you won’t have a sink to use, and will be scrambling to get to your next class with or without your teeth brushed. Just don’t do it. And on another note, throw away your trash in your room, not in the bathroom trash can. It’s annoying.

  5. DO bring your own toilet paper. The toilet paper most schools provide is, well, a grade above sandpaper. If you rather not feel raw 24/7, bringing your own 2-ply toilet paper is good idea. Plus, you’ll always have some when the bathrooms run out during fest weekends (and trust me, they do).

  6. DON’T sit on your phone for hours on the toilet. There are only a limited number of stalls, and when someone has to go, they have to go. This isn’t your home bathroom where you can scroll mindlessly through Instagram or Snapchat. Get in, and get out. Most likely, people are waiting. Cute pugs can wait.

  7. DO make sure you flush the toilet when you’re finished. Sometimes the toilets in dorms don’t all exactly flush like they’re supposed to. So please, make sure before you leave that the toilet is flushed all the way. On another note, if you’re having a particular pungent time in the bathroom, do a courtesy flush. Your neighbors will thank you.giphy-1
  8. DON’T pee in the showers. You may do it at home, and hey, it’s even a good cure for athlete’s foot. But when you’re sharing 3 showers with 20 people and the drains don’t always work, peeing in the shower is a no-no. I’ve experienced the smell myself, and it’s not pleasant. So please, keep the pee in the toilets.

  9. DO cover yourself up. Most hallways are co-ed, so please put on a towel or robe on your way to the shower or bathroom. It may be easier for you to just do the naked dash to the bathroom, but just don’t do it. Save yourself the embarrassment of the nerdy boy screaming at your bare legs and just cover up. Plus, the cold walk back to your room won’t be so cold with a towel on. giphy-1
  10. DON’T make a mess in the morning. Your 8 a.m. might be horrible and you may not be awake at 7:30 when you go to brush your teeth, but please don’t make a mess. Toothpaste all over the sinks and mirrors is not a way to make friends with your neighbors. Just be courteous, and remember, if you’re clean, your neighbors will most likely follow suit.

Follow these tips and you’re on your way to being the perfect neighbor (and not hated by everyone on your floor for being dirty).

 

Writing and research resources for graduate students at Ohio University

If you have already decided to attend Ohio University for you graduate education, then you are probably already aware that O.U. is a top research institution. But for those who are unsure if they are going to continue their education, or who are still trying to decide where to go, they should know O.U. is nationally recognized for the research its students and faculty produce. Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education, the framework used to rank colleges and universities in the U.S., ranks O.U. as a “Research II University”: it is a university that consistently generates a high output of research. And because O.U. is so focused on leading the country in a wide range of fields, from avionics engineering and virtual reality to mass media and computational neuroscience, they place a premium on providing graduate students with all the tools they need to succeed in fulfilling their goal to become world class academics.

The following is a list of five things Ohio University does to help their graduate students become better communicators, researchers, and, most importantly, advanced-degree holders.

 

1) Librarians are probably the most easily accessible but underutilized resource. Here at O.U., every college has their own designated librarian. These people literally come to work each day for eight hours just to help you find stuff. Each one specializes in a particular subject, so no matter what you are studying, there is at least one librarian that is familiar with the type of questions you are investigating. Doing a literature review on the mating habits of pygmy marmoset monkeys? Ask the biological sciences librarian; he can help. Can’t find any research on the subharmonics of Tuvan throat singers? It’s out there; you just need an expert to help you look. All the librarians at O.U. have a master’s degree in library sciences, so they are highly trained professionals who have a passion for helping young academics succeed. Jessica Hagman, the subject librarian for the Scripps College of Communication, says “just ask.” If they don’t know the answer, then they will find someone who does.“It’s our ethos: if you ask me a question, I’m going to follow it until I get you an answer,” she said. The librarians at Alden also regularly make “how to” videos and posts them on their Youtube page. Here is a short tutorial about how to use Zotero, a dynamic research tool every grad student should know how to use.

 

 

2)  E.L.I.P., or the English Language Improvement Program, is a set of courses O.U. provides to prep grad students for academic success. If you are a native English speaker, don’t be fooled, these courses can help you with writing your thesis or dissertation. There is even a course to help you prep for the dreaded oral defense. These courses, however, are an excellent option for students who are speaking English as a second language. It is hard enough to move to a place where no one speaks your native tongue, but it is even harder to speak and write academese in a language you have not been speaking since birth. E.L.I.P. can help. They have two courses exclusively for international students that teach academic vocabulary, grammar, common idioms, strategies for public speaking, and the finer points of American culture. All of these courses can be counted towards earning your degree, and there are no extra fees or costs. Dawn Bikowski, the director of E.L.I.P., says, “No other university offers this kind of support that I have come across in the country.”

3)  The Graduate Writing and Research Center (G.W.R.C.) is another great resource available to grad students at O.U. Say the end of the semester is fast approaching and you have a major paper coming due that counts for almost your entire grade, well you can take your paper to the G.W.R.C. and have them proof it. They will help you with formatting your paper, as well as provide feedback on what corrections you need to make to have a solid paper. However, keep in mind that you have to schedule an appointment well ahead of time, so don’t expect to be able to walk in the day before your paper is due.

4)  The G.W.R.C. also holds regular workshops and events to get you in gear to sit down and write your daunting paper, thesis, or dissertation. One such workshop the G.W.R.C. regularly conducts is the “Writing the Literature Review Workshop.” This workshop will help you blast through any writer’s block you might have, and get the ball rolling on your papers. The G.W.R.C. will teach you about the structure of a literature review and how you should write one, and if you already have one written and you want them to look at it, then bring it with you. The G.W.R.C. also holds events such as “The Long Night Against Procrastination” and the “Dissertation Writing Retreat.” The Long Night Against Procrastination is a six-hour writing marathon held in Alden Library where you come in and plop yourself down and begin hacking away on whatever project is going to end your life if you do not get it finished on time. The G.W.R.C. tutors and the librarians are there to help you with whatever you need. The Dissertation Writing Retreat is exactly what it sounds like: it is a week where everything you do is about writing your dissertation. The G.W.R.C. only accepts 15 students for this event, and for five days you have to commit fully to putting in some serious work on your dissertation. If you choose to sign up for the retreat, you will be given some instruction on how to write a dissertation, tutors will be available, and they’ll even teach you some techniques for stress management.

5)  On top of providing specialized courses, E.L.I.P. also has a graduate writing and critical reading lab. These labs provide a designated place on a campus where you can come in and get feedback and tutoring on whatever project you are working on. There is always a team of experienced tutors there to help you with your research. They also have computers in the lab, so if you do not have your laptop with you, they got you covered.

 

There you have it folks, five incredible services O.U. goes out of their way to provide for their graduate students. If you are smart enough to get accepted as a graduate student at O.U., then you should be smart enough to take advantage of these great resources. And if you are still on the fence about coming to O.U., then shop around; I am sure you will not find a university that is more dedicated to the success of their graduate students as Ohio University is.

Women’s Fashion in Athens: A guide to looking good at OU while not giving a sh*t about what people think of you

HIGH SCHOOL VS. COLLEGE

Ah…high school. Strategically planning your outfits the night before a full day of school as if your life depended on it seems to have been a common occurrence among teenagers. In college, nobody gives a sh*t about what you wear. I’m telling you right now to stop stressing. If you need some helpful fashion tips, keep reading.

The following information includes the general fashion trends. Do not limit yourself to these. Wear whatever you want. Be happy, comfortable, confident, and express yourself… even if it means wearing a banana suit!

WHERE TO SHOP

Amazon Prime. As a college student, you are eligible for a free 6-month trial of Amazon Prime. This will give you free two-day shipping, access to hundreds of free movies and TV shows, and access to hundreds of playlists through Prime Music. It’s awesome. After your 6-month trial is up, you get Amazon Prime for 50% off ($40 a year, so worth it). Click here to sign up! 

Court Street. Fig Leaf and The Other Place are two of the more popular boutiques on Court Street. Some of their items can be expensive, but watch for their awesome sales! If you’re looking for some nearby OU apparel, try College Bookstore, Follett University Bookstore, or UniversiTEES.

East State Street. Did you know Athens has a mall? I use the term “mall” loosely. It consists of a couple stores like Elder-Beerman and Goody’s. These places usually have some good deals. Dunham’s Sports is also located at the mall. It’s basically Athen’s version of Dick’s Sporting Goods. They also have OU apparel there. If you need to go to a real mall, the closest one is actually in Vienna, West Virginia (about a 45 minute drive).

Explore East State some more and you’ll find a couple other gems like Rue 21. Check out the whole strip. You’ll also find SHOE Department.

 

We can’t forget Walmart. Other than underwear and socks, Walmart is good for simple clothing items like tank tops, sweat pants, or t-shirts. They also have cute, cheap OU apparel!

 

 

A NO BULLSH*T, TO THE POINT, SEASON-BY-SEASON GUIDE

The following information is subject to change due to the indecisive weather of the state of Ohio.

FALL

Leggings. Skinny jeans. Boots. Scarves. Vests. Hoodies. That’s all you need to know.

WINTER

Same as above. You may want to dress a little warmer and have a heavier jacket. Make sure you dress in layers because the classrooms can get really hot. If you want to REALLY break the “not giving a sh*t” meter,  just dress up as a winter Disney princess and lighten the mood on campus. Check out The Post’s article on this dude here.

SPRING

Spring is an interesting time in Athens. It can be 40 degrees or it can be 85 degrees. You’ll want to have some flip flops, jean shorts, rompers, comfy dresses, and tank tops. If the weather is in the “in-between phase” you can always mix and match tank tops with a pair of jeans and a light jacket. Athens can be pretty rainy too. Invest in some rain boots and a rain jacket.

FEST SEASON

You should dress obnoxiously. Everything and anything is acceptable (unless you’re naked..then the horse cops will get you). Fest season might be the only time where fanny packs are actually a fashion trend. Sports jerseys seem to be a common trend too. Make sure you wear clothing that you don’t mind getting dirty. You should definitely consider wearing boots. Also, show your school spirit. Wearing a lot of OU apparel is another option.

SUMMER

Wear the same outfits you’d wear in the spring if it’s hot. You can throw a bikini in there too.

WHY YOU ULTIMATELY SHOULDN’T GIVE A SH*T

OU is the greatest school. Coming here was the greatest decision of my life and it should be yours too. I have never seen anyone get judged or made fun of over something they chose to wear. We are all a loving Bobcat family. Don’t over think it.

 

MEMORABLE QUOTES FROM SEASONED VETERANS

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Alexa Uber (sophomore), center, poses with friends. “If you like to look cute everyday, look cute everyday. If you like messy buns and sweatshirts, that works too.”
Allison Hinton fearlessly dons her fanny pack. "This isn't high school anymore so you don't need to worry about what every other girl is wearing or if you'll stand out, do whatever makes you happy!"
Allison Hinton (freshman), left, fearlessly dons her fanny pack. “This isn’t high school anymore so you don’t need to worry about what every other girl is wearing or if you’ll stand out, do whatever makes you happy!”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Victoria Fox (senior) poses with a friend prior to #fest. "Just do you boo boo."
Victoria Fox (senior), left, poses with a   friend prior to #FEST. “Just do you boo boo.”  

 

 

 

 

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Miranda Stepka (sophomore), left, poses with her friend. “Be your own person with confidence and you’ll look good in anything.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


*Subjects freely contributed the above Instagram photos