Sexual assault at Ohio University: Where to seek help and how to help others

Going to college is a pivotal moment in most young people’s lives, and coming to Ohio University to join the “Bobcat family” is often a good experience.

But OU, like every other university in the country, is not devoid of instances of sexual assault.

While it’s important to get acclimated to campus and figure out how to get to classes, knowing options for sexual assault outreach is equally as vital to a safe college experience.

So, if you’re new to campus, here’s some important information related to sexual assault that you should know:

Where to seek help

Counseling Services at OU
A map showing the locations of the Survivor Advocacy Program and OU’s Counseling and Psychological Services.

There are several places at OU to speak to someone confidentially, get tested for sexually transmitted diseases and receive other forms of support in the event of a sexual assault.

OU's Counseling and Psychological Services is located in Hudson Hall on North Green.
OU’s Counseling and Psychological Services is located in Hudson Hall on North Green.

For starters, any OU student is able to go to Counseling and Psychological Services, located on the third floor of Hudson Hall on North Green.

Drop-in appointments are available from 9:45 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. every Monday through Friday, which allows students to see a counselor the same day. Sessions with a counselor are confidential, unless information in a session includes ongoing child or elder abuse or the possibility of the patient intending to cause harm to themselves or another.

Follow-up appointments with a counselor are also available, but be aware that it often takes weeks for students to book one, especially during busier times of the semester such as during finals week.

“I went to counseling for a drop-in and they talked about how booked they were and how few staff they had and I couldn’t get in, like I got to speak to a grad student,” said Emelia Douglas, a junior studying games and animation. “I couldn’t get in with an actual professional for the rest of the year and it was like a month or two ago.”

Despite the wait times, Douglas said she feels there is adequate support provided at OU for survivors of sexual assault and that she has not personally felt unsafe on campus.

Lindley Hall
Ohio University’s Survivor Advocacy Program is located in Lindley Hall near College Green.

One such outlet for support is the Ohio University Survivor Advocacy Program, also known as OUSAP, which is located in Lindley Hall near College Green.

Prior to the 2015-16 academic year, OUSAP was the main office within the university that provided support to survivors of sexual assault at OU. Since October, however, the program has not been fully functional and was temporarily closed in November following the departure of its program coordinator.

While the university looks to refill the position for the office, students seeking confidential counseling for sexual assault have been referred to Counseling and Psychological Services, which also has licensed professionals trained to help survivors, said Laura Myers, chief of staff for the Office of the Executive Vice President and Provost.

“We do continue to have confidential services because we’re referring people to our Counseling and Psychological Services, which has drop-in hours, it has a 24-hour crisis intervention hotline,” Myers said. “So I feel like our students are being served.”

According to an email sent to students in mid-March, the program will reopen in Fall Semester and will just be called the Survivor Advocacy Program.

Medical services, such as testing for sexually transmitted diseases, are also available in Hudson Hall through OU’s Campus Care.

The university, however, does not provide rape kits, which is a DNA collection method that is typically performed soon after a sexual assault or rape. Students in need of a rape kit can find that service at O’Bleness Memorial Hospital, located on 55 Hospital Drive right at the edge of West Green.

How to help others

One of the best ways to prevent sexual assault is to stay vigilant for both yourself and your friends. On-campus groups, such as Better Bystanders, offer tips to students about how to intervene at parties or other social situations if they feel a friend may be in an unsafe situation.

Those tips are available on the group’s website through the university and include some of the following methods:

  • If you think someone needs help when in a bar, tell a bartender or an employee what is happening.
  • If you’re not sure what to do in a situation you may think is unsafe, ask people around you for help. If one person does something, everyone else may follow.
  • If you don’t feel safe helping someone out yourself, don’t be afraid to call the police.

Douglas said she employs many similar methods in order to keep herself and her friends safe when at a party or other social situation.

“Every time I go out with people I always make sure I leave with the people I came with or know if they have a game plan for what they’re doing,” she said. “I always check in with them periodically throughout the night just to make sure they’re OK.”

How to have fun when you’re under 21

Curated by Elizabeth Backo and Kate Fickell

Although Ohio University has been dubbed a No. 1 party school, there is still much to do before turning 21. Athens is filled with a variety of music and art groups along with fitness centers and beautiful bikeways. Although fest season and HallOUween may seem like the ultimate party at OU, seeing a movie at the Athena Cinema or attending a football game at Peden stadium can be just as much of a buzz.

Here’s a guide for how to have fun when you’re under 21:

Performing Arts:

1. Instrumental music, located in Memorial Auditorium and the Glidden Hall (which is at the top and bottom of Jeff Hill)

Free music is abundant on campus. The School of Music hosts different events throughout the year including OctubaFest, an event dedicated to tuba playing, and the annual Jazz Festival. In addition, there are several organizations for music majors and non-majors to participate in, including symphonies and orchestras. Events and information can be found on the School of Music’s website

2. Athena, located near The Chop Shop and The Shack on Court Street

The Athena Cinema is placed among the oldest movie theaters in the nation. It has three screens and an art deco-style interior. The theater also offers popcorn and concessions. The films include documentary, independent, classics, foreign and local. Every year, the Athena Cinema hosts multiple events including Ohio University student screenings, environmental panels and the Athens International Film + Video Festival. Follow them on Instagram and Twitter to keep up with what’s happening.

3.Improv/Comedy, located at Front Room, Donkey Coffee and Baker Theatre

Black Sheep Improv, an improvisational group on campus, takes over Front Room on Tuesdays at 8 p.m. and on Thursdays in Baker Theatre at 9 p.m. The Improv troupe spends its time making jokes and trying to get the audience to crack a few smiles. Comedy groups can also be found around campus and uptown, such as the Blue Pencil Comedy stand-up group that frequently performs at Donkey Coffee and Espresso. “I think anyway of making new friends is something I would be interested in haha! I know no one.” Bethel Park High School in Pittsburgh, PA.

4. Art Barn, located down the road behind the Summit Apartments at Coates Run

The Dairy Barn Arts Center promotes artists and provides the community access to fine arts and crafts from outside the region. The program calendar that you can check out here includes international juried exhibitions, festivals, touring exhibits, programs of regional interest, live performances and activities for all ages. They have volunteer work and Kroger community awards.

5. Choirs, performing in Memorial Auditorium on College Green

The Choral Union is a large, mixed chorus of students, faculty and townspeople. The ensemble unites annually with the Ohio University Symphony to perform outstanding major choral works. Click here to check out their page and other singing and instrumental groups. “I hope to find a job and join the choir. I don’t need alcohol or partying to have fun. Yeah, those can be fun to do but also remembering things sober are much better than not remembering.” Harrison Central High School in Cadiz, OH.

Fitness:

1. Bike Path, behind South Green

When the weather is warm and sunny, the bike path located behind South Green is a go-to place for bikers, runners, skaters and walkers. The path is relatively flat with a few twists and turns. Anyone can enjoy a view of the Hocking River or witness the blooming Japanese Cherry Blossoms in the spring. It also can be used to take a trip to Wal-Mart.

2. Ping, behind Clippinger near South Green and the golf course

The Ping Center is 168,000 square feet spanning three floors with a 36 foot, double-sided climbing wall, five basketball/volleyball courts, two multipurpose gymnasiums, a four-lane indoor running track, seven racquetball courts and two fitness areas. Ping Center also provides free weights, aerobics, fitness, combative sports, dance, and meeting rooms. Follow Ping on Twitter to keep up! “I just want to take in as much as possible and find what interests me. I want to get the experience that comes with finally moving out of your parents’ house and be on your own. I love spending time in the gym.” Monroe Central High School in Woodsfield, OH.

3. Sport Fields, multiple locations described below

Peden stadium, located near the Convocation Center, has a seating capacity of 24,000 and hosts Bobcat football. Students attend football games in the fall to cheer on the Bobcats as well as collect free gear and food. The Marching 110 also plays a halftime performance that leaves the audience bouncing with excitement. The Intramural Fields are located between East Green and the Hocking River and offer individual, dual and team sports for men, women and coed teams in a variety of seasonal league and tournament formats. “I’m committed to the women’s soccer team so for fun I plan on hanging out with my future teammates.” Buckeye Valley High School in Delaware, OH.

4. Bird Arena, located near the bottom of Baker Center

Bird Arena is another outlet for people who would rather slide then run. The indoor arena provides a 190-by-85 foot surface for skaters of all ages. Bird Arena has open skate hours which can be found online and might change for the 2016-17 academic year. Skate rental fees are $3.50. Additionally, the arena offers different programs such as synchronized skating, club hockey and even beginner classes that can be taken for academic credit. You can find this icy rink at the bottom of Baker Center.

Media:

1. The Post, room 325 in Baker Center

The Post is one of several media outlets on campus. After more than 100 years of publishing, The Post is becoming a weekly tabloid with a daily digital product. The organization covers a range of topics from blog posts about pet Instagrams to political controversy on campus. The Post has several staffs that work daily to produce its product, which includes culture, sports, news, copy editing, digital, social media, design, multimedia and photography.

2. Backdrop, office located in Baker Center in room 309 or can be contacted here

Backdrop is a magazine on campus that publishes four times throughout the academic year. The magazine focuses on long-form content ranging from the history of fashion at OU to an in depth look into police officers’ K-9 sidekicks. “I also got into OSU but I chose OU over it. I am really looking forward to being involved with certain magazines on campus, especially the one dedicated to music because although I don’t play an instrument, I love all genres of music and talking about them.” Hilliard Davidson High School in Hilliard, OH.

3. The Athens News, located between Red Brick and Cats Eye on Court Street

Known for its in-depth local news reporting, The Athens News features news, entertainment and an advertising section. With Ohio University making up an important segment of the Athens County population, The Athens News newspaper is able to effectively reach both the university and community markets, according to its website. The publication has written about everything from Number Fest to the construction of uptown bars.

OUr voice on campus: activism at OHIO

Activism and protest is language on campus.

It’s a form of expression and of passion.

It’s OUr voice.

And this is how we use it.

 

 

A guide to Instagram: Athens edition

Nestled in the foothills of Appalachia, Ohio University and the city that hosts it are a mix of bricks, hills and green spaces you’re unlikely to find anywhere else. Athens provides students with a bevy of beautiful photos.

And like most college students, Bobcats love their Instagram feeds. The following is a collection of some of the most Instagram-worthy spots in Athens.

Campus Gateway

Just a little excited to be home ?? #athens #bobcats #alumniproblems #ohiouniversity #becauseshebeatme

A photo posted by Alyssa Marie Wilson (@alyssawilson628) on

One of two spots on campus known by some as the campus gates. The other is currently getting a facelift.

Getting there

This spot sits at the northwest corner of College Green. In other words, it’s on the corner of Union St. and Court St.

Tips and Tricks

If there aren’t many people around the gates when you walk by, take advantage of the moment and get your picture — most days at least one campus organization will be handing out flyers here.

Bong Hill

 

Just hanging OUt ??☀️ #BongHill #OhioU #Athens #Hiking

A photo posted by Calvin Holloway (@calhollow) on

Despite the name, I’ve never walked in on people doing illegal things here. Wear comfortable shoes because it’s going to be quite the walk.

Screen Shot 2016-04-17 at 2.25.14 PMGetting There

The most physically ambitious spot on this list, a trip to Bong Hill is not for the faint of heart. Enlarge the map to the right to see how to get there on foot. It’ll be about a two-mile trek by foot. The final ascent is a steep couple hundred feet.

Tips and Tricks

If you’re lucky enough to have a friend with a car, have that person drive you there. It’ll shorten the journey by a tremendous amount. If you’re going by foot, be careful walking along the side of the road. You’ll be on a state route for a few minutes.

It’s important to note it’s unclear how legal this OU tradition is. The land isn’t clearly marked as private property, but there appears to be a residence somewhat close to the vantage point.

Emeriti Park

The springtime lunch times ???? #OUpics #athensohio #ohiouniversity

A photo posted by Emily (@svveetdisposition) on

You might’ve already seen this park on a visit to OU. It’s a good place to study on a sunny day.

Getting there

The park is situated between Baker University Center, Clippinger Laboratories and the Ping Center.  You can’t miss it.

Tips and Tricks

The pond is pretty in the spring and fall, but walk here in the winter after a light snow. It’s a wonderland.

Bike Path

The bike path on the edge of campus is part of the Hockhocking Adena Bikeway, a 21-mile bike path that stretches all the way to Nelsonville. Our slice of the path plays host to Sakura blossoms in the spring and a frozen Hocking River in the Winter.

Getting there

The bike path hugs the Hocking River on the outskirts of campus. Popular spots for entering the bike trail are the bridge on Richland Ave., South Green and Union Street. You should be able to get there in five minutes or less from just about anywhere on campus.

Tips and Tricks

The path is a favorite for runners, dog walkers and cyclists. Part of the path is lit by streetlamps, but I wouldn’t advise spending time here after dark. It’s relatively secluded compared to the rest of campus.

College Green

Screen Shot 2016-04-17 at 2.59.21 PMThe heart of OU is also the oldest area of the campus. According to OU’s website, Cutler Hall, the building in the middle of the above photo, was built in 1816 and currently houses some administrators, including the president.

Getting there

Most of the photos of College Green are taken from in front of the campus gateway, denoted by the little gray point on the map to the right.

Tips and Tricks

If you work up an appetite taking this picture, there are usually several food trucks stationed along Union St., including the famed Burrito Buggy.

Court Street

Many would call Court Street the true heart of OU. Well over 10 bars call this half-mile stretch home, which only adds to OU’s reputation as a party school. But beyond the bars, Court Street’s bricks are iconic, and many of the buildings have maintained their historic facades.

Getting there

From the top floor of Baker University Center, you can get to Court Street by walking straight out of the doors and down the street between Scripps Hall and the Alpha Delta Pi sorority house.

Tips and Tricks

Employers are increasingly checking out your online identity before hiring you. While Court Street can make for some artful pictures, you might want to hold off on posting that picture of you and your friends having a little too much fun at the bar, even when you’re of age.

The Ridges

#TheRidges #AthensOhio #KeepAthensWeird

A photo posted by Cameron Price (@akidnamedcam) on

Formerly known as the Athens Lunatic Asylum, a walk to The Ridges is a Halloween tradition for many OU students. Some of the buildings are now used by the University in various capacities, but they once were home to Billy Milligan — a serial killer who will be portrayed by Leo DiCaprio in an upcoming movie.

Getting there

You can see the ridges from most places on campus, but to walk there you’ll need to cross the bridge near Peden Stadium on Richland Ave. There are sidewalks and crosswalks. Once you cross the roundabout after the bridge, walk up the brick path on your right, and you’re there.

Tips and Tricks

It is possible to go inside the abandoned buildings. Some students do it at night for a cheap thrill — but it might not be so cheap after all, because it’s illegal, and if caught you’ll be paying a hefty fine.

Five reasons Bobcat fans should be excited for the 2016-17 mens basketball season

In its second season under head coach Saul Phillips (pictured above), the Ohio Bobcats made an encouraging 13-game improvement in the win column to finish the season with a 23-12 record before losing to Buffalo in the MAC Tournament semifinal. In the postseason College Basketball Invitational (CBI), the Bobcats fell to Moorhead State in the semifinals.

After losing just one senior (forward Treg Setty) to graduation while having several key starters returning, the 2016-17 Bobcats certainly figure to compete for the top spot in the MAC and appear to have a legitimate shot at reaching the NCAA Tournament for the first season since 2012. Here are five reasons incoming freshman and all Bobcat fans should be excited for the upcoming season of Ohio mens basketball.

1. The Convo is home to the best sporting event on campus

When the NCAA releases yearly attendance statistics for each conference, Ohio routinely leads the MAC in drawing the biggest crowds per game. Attendance numbers for last season haven’t been released yet, but in 2014 “The Best Fans in the MAC” led the conference with an average of 6,681 fans per-game, which ranked higher than nationally renowned programs such as Baylor, Texas Tech, Washington and Gonzaga. If you are coming to Ohio looking for an electric atmosphere to watch a live sporting event, joining the student section “O-Zone” at The Convo is defintiely your best bet. Check out this awesome video taken during Ohio’s 76-64 win over conference rival Miami (OH) for a glimpse of what it’s like to experience a game at The Convo.

 

2The (likely) return of MAC Player of the Year Antonio Campbell

Antonio Campbell was so good for the Bobcats last season that the forward decided to declare for the NBA draft. He didn’t hire an agent, meaning Campbell is eligible to withdraw his name from the draft by the May. 25th deadline and return to Athens fo

MAC POY Antonio Campbell goes up for a salm dunk
MAC POY Antonio Campbell goes up for a salm dunk

r his senior season. Conventional wisdom says Campbell will be back with the Bobcats, which is great news after he led the team in scoring (17.1 PPG) and rebounding (10.2 RPG) to earn Mid-American Conference Player of The Year honors as well as being named to the Associated Press honorable mention All-American section. He was the only MAC player included in the AP’s All-American team. In his senior season, Campbell figures to once again be among the most dominant players in the MAC and act as the centerpiece on offense for the Bobcats.

3. Point guard Jaaron Simmons is breaking records

After transferring last year from the University of Houston, Jaaron Simmons still has two years of eligibility left for the Bobcats which is among the biggest reasons why the team will be a force in the MAC for the next couple years. Simmons proved to be one of the best playmakers in the nation last season as his 7.8 assists per-game ranked third in all of college basketball. He finished the season with 264 assists, surpassing D.J. Cooper’s record for the most assists in a single season in Ohio program history. Cooper is thought to be one of the greatest players to ever play for Ohio, so it is exciting to think of what else Simmons will achieve in his next two years at Ohio.

4. Youth all around the roster

In Campbell and Simmons, I’ve already mentioned two of Ohio’s premier returning players, but in reality basically the entire team is returning from last season meaning expectations will be higher for this Bobcat squad than any in recent memory. Although players can still transfer before the start of next season, Treg Setty is the only Bobcat being lost to graduation. This current roster of youthful Bobcats are positioning themselves to not only be good next year but also many years to come, meaning incoming freshman will be able to watch Ohio’s current crop of players grow into upperclassmen during their time at OU.

Shooting guard Jordan Darts averaged 9.8 points for Ohio as a freshman
Shooting guard Jordan Darts averaged 9.8 points for Ohio as a freshman

Freshman Gavin Block and Jordan Dartis were key contributors for Ohio last season, while sharp shooter Kenny Kaminsky will be returning as a redshirt junior. In other good news, Ohio’s recent success and strong current nucleus of young talent should make it easier for coach Saul Phillips to draw more top recruits to Athens.

5. We have a really cool coach

Ohio coach Saul Phillips is a treat to be around. His press conferences are always a spectacle because Phillips has a great sense of humor that is noticeable the second you meet him. The third-year coach seemingly genuinely enjoys being apart of the Athens community and is committed to building Ohio into a perennial NCAA Tournament contender. Before signing a five-year contract with Ohio, Phillips was the head coach at North Dakotah State University from 2007-2014 and led the Bisons to two NCAA Tournament appearances. Phillips’ passion and enthusiasm is contagious and the Bobcats are in great hands for as long as he is at the helm.

Decoding the DARS: How I graduated a year early

The hardest part is over. You’ve applied, been accepted, and are ready to begin life as a Bobcat. Aside from all the excitement of giving your dorm room that personal touch, bonding with your roommate over  your newfound independence, and binge eating during that first trip to the dining hall, you suddenly realize that you’re here to obtain a degree. Enter the Degree Audit Reporting System, or DARS, and welcome to the Bible of your college career.

DARS Cheat Sheet. Use this to help decode what each symbol on the stars means.
DARS Cheat Sheet. Use this to help decode what each symbol on the stars means.

According to Ohio University, your DARS report is the official tool for tracking your academic progress, which analyzes degree requirements for a major, minor, or certificate according to the catalog year in which you entered the program. DARS reports are the printed results of the analysis. The DARS report displays the courses from which you must select in order to complete degree requirements, and it shows how the completed courses apply toward those requirements. In in simpler terms, the DARS is a report that tracks your progress to graduation based on the academic track you’ve chosen to embark on.

I’m going to explain the DARS step by step, because whether we like it or not, this little document full of random course titles and confusing phrases is the key to graduating. Uncover what those requirements mean, which options best fit you, and how to successfully turn each section from red to green.

  1. Locate the DARS 

 

2. University Requirements

 

3. Tiers

 

4. Course Requirements

 

5. In Progress Classes

 

6. Course Offerings

 

7. Free Electives 

 

8. Course Record

 

9. What-If DARS 

 

Go ahead and take a deep breath. You are now on your way to becoming a master of the DARS. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. Reach out to your advisor, set up a time to meet, and relish in the comfort of knowing how to stay on track to graduation.

 

Recap: Advice From Advisors 

  1. Read your DARS carefully. Take time to sit down and read through your entire DARS.
  2. Plus (+) and minus (-) symbols appear next to each section on your DARS and provide a guide as to what you have completed and what you still need to complete before you can earn your degree.
  3. Also, pay attention under each area where it says NEEDS.  This is telling you exactly what you still need to complete, whether it’s a specific course or set of courses, or a certain number of credit hours.
  4. It’s always important to email your academic advisor if you have questions.  You can find your academic advisor in two places: 1) In your MyOhio Student Center portal and 2) on the left side of the first page of your DARS, located just beneath your GPA.
  5. If you need an appointment with your academic advisor, always be prepared for your appointment.  Print and bring a copy of your DARS if you can, come with a list of your questions and concerns and bring a paper and pen to write down the information your advisor gives you.
  6. Use the course catalog to look up required classes for every major, minor and certificate.  This is also a great way to check requisites for classes, so you can be sure you’re eligible to enroll in the class yourself.

 

Other Resources

Ohio University offers advising help in the Allen Center on the fourth floor of Baker Center Monday–Thursday, 8 a.m.–7 p.m and Friday, 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Other majors also offer walk-in advising during a specific block of time once a week, no appointment necessary. Check with your advisor for details.

 

 

The five free apps every OU freshman needs to get a 4.0.

So, you’re starting at Ohio University next year and you’re worried you won’t be able to get that GPA high enough. Look no further — with some hard work, determination and these five apps, you’ll be on the way to a 4.0 first semester.

Google Drive

Google Drive for iOS.
Google Drive for iOS.

You can’t get a 4.0 if you’ve lost all of your documents!

At the beginning of the semester, I wasn’t saving my work on Google Drive, and for a while I had no problems. But when disaster struck and my computer broke when my phone slid off of my lap into the screen, I was unable to access any of the work I was working on. It was toward the end of the semester, and I had to start several projects and papers over again. It wasn’t fun. At that point, I vowed to save everything I did on my Drive. And just a few weeks when my replacement computer also broke (it actually broke in half, see picture below), I was able to access my files from my phone and the computers at Alden Library. So, even though I was incredibly inconvenienced by my lack of computer, I was able to pick up right where I left off. I learned from my mistakes, and so should you.

Broken computer.
A sad boy and his broken computer.

I use Google Drive all of the time, because as a college student I need to be able to access my files all the time,” said Gaby Godinez, a sophomore studying Integrated Media. “ I like it because it’s easy to understand and it keeps me organized. It’s also so easy to share files and work together on projects when you aren’t together.”

Having all of your documents at your fingertips can be a lifesaver. Are the printers in Alden broken and is your paper due in mere minutes? No problem. Email the document from the Drive app to your professor, and let them know you will print it out as soon as the printers come back online.

While there are other cloud alternatives, Google Drive is great for collaboration, user-friendly and the first 15 GB of stored data is free (and you probably won’t need any more).

 

Download Google Drive here for iOS

Download Google Drive here for Android  

 

Amazon

Amazon app
Amazon for iOS.

Need something in a jiffy? The student six month free trial of Amazon Prime is your best bet. How will this help you get a 4.0? Textbooks, of course! Nearly all textbooks you will need your freshman year are available on Amazon, and with the Prime membership, you’ll get them with two days with free shipping.

“You can wait until after your first few classes and receive the textbooks in a matter of two days. So, it’s very convenient, it save you money, everything is discounted and the products are good quality and easily returnable,” said Libby Chidlow, a junior studying journalism and political science.

Chidlow hasn’t just ordered textbooks with her Prime membership. She orders her daily essentials, like soap, shampoo and face wash because she finds the prices tend to be cheaper on Amazon than at brick-and-mortar stores.

She says she ordered all of her Christmas presents for friends and family members using the app this past December, and when the weather turned warm last week, she ordered a hammock and had it in two days.

“I order from Amazon an unhealthy amount,” Chidlow admitted. “My mom told me I should be an Amazon ambassador.” That’s a thing, by the way.

 

Sign up here for your free Prime account.

Download Amazon here for iOS.

Download Amazon here for Android.  

 

Microsoft OneNote

OneNote for iOS.
OneNote for iOS.

Although I’m not the biggest fan of Microsoft (to each his own), the OneNote application is an excellent app for taking notes and keeping organized in all classes your freshman year. It makes keeping the notes organized easier than with Microsoft Word or other standard text editing software. The mobile apps allow for easy syncing between devices and if you forget your laptop — no problem! Just pull out your phone or tablet and pick up where you left off.

“OneNote syncs all of my notes between all of my devices. It is very easy to set up outlines and bulleted lists,” said Nate Doughty, a freshman studying journalism. “I’m able to draw and highlight and on both phone and with with my laptop which doubles as a tablet. In the past I used Google Docs to take notes, and that was fine, but this is lightyears better for organizational purposes.”

The best part? The full-featured version of OneNote comes with a subscription to Office 365, which is free for all OU students through the Bobcat Depot. You can find a download link from your Catmail when you get your account next year.

Most professors permit computer use for note taking, although some forbid the use of computers, tablets and phones, so make sure you bring a notepad and pen!

 

Download OneNote here for iOS.

Download OneNote here for Android.

 

BB Student

BB Student for iOS.
BB Student for iOS.

If you’re unfamiliar with Blackboard, it’s time to change that. Most professors at Ohio University use Blackboard to post lectures, assignments, discussion questions and even grades. There’s no mobile website, and the full-featured site loses some functionality when viewing on a phone. Have no fear, though, BB Student here!

While it won’t let you do everything you can on the computer, it’s a great way to quickly view upcoming assignments, course syllabi or grades. It’s biggest flaw? It makes you login with your OUID and password every time you launch the app, but otherwise, it’s a great way login to the site when your computer is not in reach.

“I’ll admit, it’s not the best app, but it has definitely made my life a lot easier this year,” said Marianne Dodson, a freshman studying journalism and political science in the Honors Tutorial College.  “I hate that I have to login everytime I open it, but it’s still way more efficient than visiting the site through Safari, because Blackboard doesn’t usually work on there. I can quickly see the contents of my courses and really easily check my grades, which is usually why I open the app.”

 

Download BB Student here for iOS.

Download BB Student here for Android.

 

2048

2048 for iOS.
2048 for iOS.

 

You probably once enjoyed 2048, but have since deleted it to make room for some extra photos or a software update. Well, it’s time to bring it back.

While it’s certainly not the most important app to obtaining a 4.0, everyone needs a study break to clear their mind. And yes, 2048 is a game, but it’s math based and will definitely keep your mind sharp unlike a Netflix break (although those are nice sometimes,too).

Just be careful — it’s addictive!

 

Download 2048 here for iOS.

Download 2048 here for Android.

And here, for a bonus, play online on your computer.

Clean or Dirty: The Fine Lines of Social Media in College

Since high school many students have always been told to keep a “clean” social media presence. In regards to “clean” students have assumed to not post anything that would come back to hurt them in the future. However, not all students have a similar belief in regard to social media.

Junior Brian Beckstedt feels social media is a form of free speech that should be used to express himself.

Ohio University Student tweet
Ohio University Student tweet

“It helps me to express myself better, and it let’s people know my feelings on a certain subject,” Beckstedt a business major said.

Beckstedt feels social media is for the benefit of getting the message out that he wants in the moment. Being a business major, he finds himself in a unique situation. Following college, he is going to join the family business.

Beckstedt recognizes not censoring his thoughts can be a potential threat to other employers but he wants people to appreciate him for who he is and what he believes.

“Social media can be threatening if you are using words too often it may shy a potential employer away,” Beckstedt added. “But for me I have a special circumstance where I work for my father, and other family.”

For Laura Garotti, a senior studying journalism she has a different tone in regard to social media. Garotti has to create a brand and an image around who she is for potential employers.

“I keep (social media) clean because as a journalist, I like to be transparent and be able to make all of my profiles public,” Garotti explained.

What employers think is important for Garotti. She feels future coworkers could additionally alter work life due to a social media experience.

“You also never know when a coworker will request to add you on Facebook and potentially show others what you post.”

Being a journalism major plays a big role in keeping her social media clean according to the senior. Having a major that is in the public eye is a major part of keeping social media clean.

Ohio University student tweet
Ohio University Student Tweet

“(Some other majors) aren’t in the public eye, but I also believe they don’t completely realize how little privacy you actually get when you go online,” Garotti added.

Most students have slipped up on social media from time to time and Garotti explained she is no different, but in regards to future job security she feels she is safe.

“Oh, I’ve definitely had bad posts that I’ve regretted, but nothing that I think would cost me a job, thanks to thinking before I post.”

6 social media accounts every incoming Bobcat should follow

Starting college can be terrifying (I know it was for me), especially if you don’t know what to expect coming in. I’m a first-generation freshman at Ohio University, so I had absolutely no idea what I was in for when I got to campus. Now that I’m just a few days away from the end of my first year of college, I’d like to share some tips with my future fellow Bobcats as to how to get through your first year of college. I’ve created a list of the major social media users every incoming student should like or follow to help ease the transition and make the most of living in Athens.

  1. OHIObso on Instagram 

The Bobcat Student Orientation Instagram account is a useful tool for freshmen or new students due to the fact that it offers a wide variety of tips about Ohio University’s campus. Be sure to check it out and follow it for ideas about new study spots or just some fun facts about the campus!

2. Jenny Hall-Jones on Twitter

Jenny Hall-Jones, Dean of Students and Interim Vice President for Student Affairs, has an active presence on Twitter. She tweets not only about on-campus activities, but also encouraging messages to OU students such as the one above. She also retweets other students fairly often, so be sure to follow her and tweet at her to get a shoutout!

3. University Program Council on Facebook

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The University Program Council at OU puts on fun and free events for students periodically throughout the year. It brought Metro Station to Baker University Center, allowing students to take a study break at a free concert during the last week of classes. The organization updates its Facebook page more frequently than its Twitter, so be sure to stay updated by liking it on Facebook!

4. Scalia Lab Athens OH on Twitter 

The Scalia Lab right here in Athens keeps OU students up to date on the latest weather, including snow emergencies during the winter months. Living in the midwest, we need to be sure someone is watching out for the next unexpected turn of weather, and the Scalia Lab does just that. It has saved me during quite a few unexpected weather emergencies (including the sudden foot of snow we got one day in January out of absolutely nowhere).

5. Your graduating class on Facebook 

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Find your class page on Facebook as soon as possible. While there are students who just post in the group to be distracting, annoying or obnoxious, there are a lot of posts that can be helpful. People post about lost IDs, potential new groups and even roommate searches. You just might find your college best friend in the group! Or at least your lost ID.

6. Other incoming students in your program of study on any platform 

The easiest way to do this is to search your program of study on Twitter or Instagram. You could also try to be a go-getter and create a Facebook group, but that may not work unless you know at least a few other people to invite to the group. Following and even messaging some of your future fellow Bobcats is the best way to make sure you’re not coming to campus knowing absolutely no one. If you’re proactive in making friends, the transition from high school and parental dependence to college and independence will be much less scary.

 

There are other social media accounts that could be of use to new students, but these are the lifesavers in my experience. Just keep in mind that college is an incredible time in which people grow and discover who they are. It’s okay to be afraid of this big transition, but it’s also okay to come in excited and ready for the next step in life.

11 Posts That Speak The Truth About Dorm Life

  1. No matter if it’s 6 a.m. or 9 p.m., these are always true. Countless times I found myself avoiding people crying on the phone around Thanksgiving (often referred to as Breaksgiving due to the high number of break ups) at all hours.

2. I can’t deny writing a few pass-aggressive notes in my time. The best example of this that I witnessed (I swear I wasn’t involved) was in the bathrooms of James Hall my freshman year. Our bathrooms were communal, and one girl left a note on the shower for everyone to see about having sex in the shower. Also, my friend used to sneeze in Adams Hall and her neighbors would yell back “Bless you!”

quiet sex image
via http://www.buzzfeed.com/brittneygibson/images-that-scream-i-live-in-a-college-dorm#.viGbdPdMb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Trust me, you will pile in a car as soon as you find someone with keys. We used to hike it to the Athens County Fairgrounds, almost a mile away, just to drive out to the movie theater. One of my favorite college memories was going to the Hunger Games premiere in my friend’s SUV. I’m pretty sure we fit 10 people in the car!

having a car in dorm'
via http://www.buzzfeed.com/moerder/things-youll-do-your-first-semester-of-college#.wnj2qNq52

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Your room will probably smell, and you’ll look for ways to fix it. A classic dorm fix is the “dryer sheet-on-the-AC-unit,” releasing a constant smell of ‘Clean Linen.’ Not to worry, those without AC units. Febreze might mask whatever odors are in your room.

desk not for studying
via http://www.buzzfeed.com/kirstenking/things-that-inevitably-happen-while-living-in-a-college-d#.riPWlAl5W

5. My desk became a storage area whether it was for my winter coat, packets of Ramen or $300 textbooks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6. Athens is the home of late night foods. No matter the condition you eat them in, probably half of the food joints uptown are open for late night hours. A break from the dining halls is much needed, so don’t regret that 2 a.m. charge on your debit card.

pizza at 2 am
via http://www.buzzfeed.com/kirstenking/things-that-inevitably-happen-while-living-in-a-college-d#.riPWlAl5W

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7. Free. Stuff. If I had to sum up my time in the dorm, it would be that they’ll bribe you to do pretty much anything with food. Study with food, taking a bystander course with food or even learn about safe sex with food.

8. Ah, the college Jenga. A classic route to avoid taking out the recycling or trash, especially when you live on the fourth floor. If you join hall council in the building you live in, you may even get to take other people’s trash out to raise money!

via http://imgur.com/gallery/alqulI0
via http://imgur.com/gallery/alqulI0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9. In Sargent Hall, I was blessed with the ability to live in the same hall as the wrestlers. I was NOT blessed to have the ability to smell the wrestlers. The first floor was a mouth-breathing only zone.

floor that smells
via http://www.buzzfeed.com/kirstenking/things-that-inevitably-happen-while-living-in-a-college-d#.riPWlAl5W

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10. This sarcastic tweet speaks the truth for real. I always thought I was going to be able to live in Bromley Hall my sophomore year. Little did I know, the second day of room selection wasn’t even good enough to get a renovated dorm.

 

11. “Easy as 1, 2, 3” yet there are seven steps in this graphic. When you run into problems, it can be tough to get them resolved. Once, I had a bat family living in my air conditioning unit. I had to submit a maintenance request three times before the “bat man” came to fix the hole in my air conditioning unit that the bats had crawled through.